havas Content printed form Havas - The Download - https://download.havas.com/posts/cannes-2018-day-three-inside-the-palais/
News

Cannes 2018: Day Three Inside the Palais

Cannes 2018: Day Three Inside the Palais

Natasha Smith

Natasha Smith

June 20, 2018

Several successful entrepreneurs, a famed comedian, and an athlete turned mega businessman, all stress the importance of purpose and genuineness.

Being genuine. Having purpose. Making an impact. Modern branding is one that plugs into the genuine concerns of those who are receiving the messages. Consumers want to engage about the things that matter to them—and several panelists spent time teaching advertisers how to tap into those genuine concerns.

 

Here is Day Three at the Palais:

"Remaining pure means staying focused on a purpose. And without purpose, Dennis said, a company has a far less chance of becoming, or remaining, successful."

11:04 Founders’ Formula: Pioneering for Purposeful Growth

What makes an entrepreneur an entrepreneur? Most people would classify those who start their own businesses as passionate. It takes passion, determination, and grit to turn a budding dreaming into a flourishing business.

Keith Weed, CMO of Unilever, says bringing entrepreneurs, or “founders,” into the company is one way the consumer goods giant remains purposeful, passionate, and connected to the global community and its needs.

“There’s a mystery around founders,” Weed said. “We also try to keep founders within our business—working with us and driving our businesses forward.”

When Unilever brings in founders of businesses who have impact, purpose, and success, that ethos then lives within the larger company—one that can then advance those same missions and beliefs with a greater amount of resources but the same passion.

“The best way to have a healthy business is to have a healthy society,” Weed explained to the late-morning crowd inside the Lumière Theatre.

So the chief marketer invited several successful founders on the stage with him to share their mission which they’ve integrated into Unilever. Each explained how they got their starts and the passion behind what they do.

“We did it as a means to survive until we go back home [in Africa],” said Richelieu Dennis, founder, CEO, and Executive Chairman of Sundial Brands—which is home to a plethora of brands for women of color, including Shea Moisture products. “What we noticed was that there were no brands focused on the needs of women of color. So we started to really focus on that and make natural products… And with that we wanted to provide economic opportunity for women of color.”

Finding a community that has unmet needs is one talent of an entrepreneur—having clear vision is another. “Our business is about humans being more human—it’s about human touch,” said Jane Wurwand, co-founder of skincare brand Dermalogica. Wurwand described how in the fledgling days of her company, she refused to sway from the original vision of her products for promises of resources from big companies. “You always have to be true to your brand. Defend it,” she said. “[When] you love what you’re doing, it shows up in the product.”

Echoing that same sentiment was Guido Martinetti, founder and CEO of Italian gelato brand Grom: “Stay pure; stay true,” Martinetti said. “If you forget it, you lose your identity.”

Remaining pure means staying focused on a purpose. And without purpose, Dennis said, a company has a far less chance of becoming, or remaining, successful. “Gone are the days where a product is successful because it has superior functionality,” he said. “What makes the difference is the value that the product brings to the life of that person. People care about those things now, more than they ever did.”

“I have to be myself and stay true,” Shaq said. “One thing people can sniff out is if you’re being authentic or not.”

2:01 p.m. Conan and Shaq—Jacks of All Trades, Masters of Some

Purpose was also a big theme at the afternoon chat with funny man Conan O’Brien and athlete-turned-mogul Shaquille O’Neal.  Both Conan and Shaq kicked off their panel with a deluge of jokes, talking about everything from a hard-to-understand French accent to Shaq’s impressive height and the illuminating smartphones that filled the theater—all pointed at the two stars on stage.

As CNN’s Chris Cuomo guided the talk, he asked about genuineness. “I have to be myself and stay true,” Shaq said. “One thing people can sniff out is if you’re being authentic or not.”

Conan expanded on this, saying that true genuine behavior prompts dialogue, change, and engagement. “The late-night television that I grew up with was never a conversation,” Conan said. “You were a passive recipient of whatever great comedian was on. Now there’s a conversation.”

“That’s what we can do now,” he continued. “It was not possible six, seven years ago. That’s why—I’ve been doing this for 25 years now—and it’s much more exciting now.”

And Conan stressed that with him, and his brand, what you see is what you get: “I’m not an actor playing Conan O’Brien. This is me; this is who I am.”

http://

http://

Being genuine. Having purpose. Making an impact. Modern branding is one that plugs into the genuine concerns of those who are receiving the messages. Consumers want to engage about the things that matter to them—and several panelists spent time teaching advertisers how to tap into those genuine concerns.

 

Here is Day Three at the Palais:

"Remaining pure means staying focused on a purpose. And without purpose, Dennis said, a company has a far less chance of becoming, or remaining, successful."

11:04 Founders’ Formula: Pioneering for Purposeful Growth

What makes an entrepreneur an entrepreneur? Most people would classify those who start their own businesses as passionate. It takes passion, determination, and grit to turn a budding dreaming into a flourishing business.

Keith Weed, CMO of Unilever, says bringing entrepreneurs, or “founders,” into the company is one way the consumer goods giant remains purposeful, passionate, and connected to the global community and its needs.

“There’s a mystery around founders,” Weed said. “We also try to keep founders within our business—working with us and driving our businesses forward.”

When Unilever brings in founders of businesses who have impact, purpose, and success, that ethos then lives within the larger company—one that can then advance those same missions and beliefs with a greater amount of resources but the same passion.

“The best way to have a healthy business is to have a healthy society,” Weed explained to the late-morning crowd inside the Lumière Theatre.

So the chief marketer invited several successful founders on the stage with him to share their mission which they’ve integrated into Unilever. Each explained how they got their starts and the passion behind what they do.

“We did it as a means to survive until we go back home [in Africa],” said Richelieu Dennis, founder, CEO, and Executive Chairman of Sundial Brands—which is home to a plethora of brands for women of color, including Shea Moisture products. “What we noticed was that there were no brands focused on the needs of women of color. So we started to really focus on that and make natural products… And with that we wanted to provide economic opportunity for women of color.”

Finding a community that has unmet needs is one talent of an entrepreneur—having clear vision is another. “Our business is about humans being more human—it’s about human touch,” said Jane Wurwand, co-founder of skincare brand Dermalogica. Wurwand described how in the fledgling days of her company, she refused to sway from the original vision of her products for promises of resources from big companies. “You always have to be true to your brand. Defend it,” she said. “[When] you love what you’re doing, it shows up in the product.”

Echoing that same sentiment was Guido Martinetti, founder and CEO of Italian gelato brand Grom: “Stay pure; stay true,” Martinetti said. “If you forget it, you lose your identity.”

Remaining pure means staying focused on a purpose. And without purpose, Dennis said, a company has a far less chance of becoming, or remaining, successful. “Gone are the days where a product is successful because it has superior functionality,” he said. “What makes the difference is the value that the product brings to the life of that person. People care about those things now, more than they ever did.”

“I have to be myself and stay true,” Shaq said. “One thing people can sniff out is if you’re being authentic or not.”

2:01 p.m. Conan and Shaq—Jacks of All Trades, Masters of Some

Purpose was also a big theme at the afternoon chat with funny man Conan O’Brien and athlete-turned-mogul Shaquille O’Neal.  Both Conan and Shaq kicked off their panel with a deluge of jokes, talking about everything from a hard-to-understand French accent to Shaq’s impressive height and the illuminating smartphones that filled the theater—all pointed at the two stars on stage.

As CNN’s Chris Cuomo guided the talk, he asked about genuineness. “I have to be myself and stay true,” Shaq said. “One thing people can sniff out is if you’re being authentic or not.”

Conan expanded on this, saying that true genuine behavior prompts dialogue, change, and engagement. “The late-night television that I grew up with was never a conversation,” Conan said. “You were a passive recipient of whatever great comedian was on. Now there’s a conversation.”

“That’s what we can do now,” he continued. “It was not possible six, seven years ago. That’s why—I’ve been doing this for 25 years now—and it’s much more exciting now.”

And Conan stressed that with him, and his brand, what you see is what you get: “I’m not an actor playing Conan O’Brien. This is me; this is who I am.”

http://

http://

Natasha Smith is the strategic communications manager for Havas Group. She happily represents 404 in the 212.

contact our office

Call:

Stop by:

Connect: