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Making Meaningful Connections With Busy Consumers

Making Meaningful Connections With Busy Consumers

Mathias Staar

Mathias Staar

March 19, 2018

“Respect your customers' time and you'll reap the rewards,” writes Havas Düsseldorf's Mathias Staar.

"The actual time at our disposal is only used for the things that have meaning to us."

Little Black Book Online

By: Mathias Staar
Head of Strategic Planning, Havas Düsseldorf

March 14, 2018

 

Do you really have time for this article? You may simply take the time to read it because you expect it to be of some use. Well, thank you very much for that, because I can imagine how limited your time is.

Our days are full of activities that are important, or that we at least consider important. Curiously, the older we get, the further we climb up the career ladder, the more things pull at us, the more our days get crowded, and the less time we have. The actual time at our disposal is only used for the things that have meaning to us—because our time is finite.

So it’s no wonder that we think very carefully about which brands we give our time to. And yet, it is surprising that as a consequence, most people wouldn’t care if three out of four brands completely disappeared. Yes, you heard that correctly, 74% of all brands.

The reason for this is simple: These brands are meaningless. They’re simply not worth sacrificing our time, because their messages are superficial. Choosing these brands would inevitably be a decision against one of the many alternatives that we consider to be meaningful. So, brands face a meaningful competition with “content” of all kinds: conversations with our family, a new series on Netflix, walking the dog, or our favorite influencer vlog.

This has two clear consequences for marketing and communication:

1. Too much does not help too much: The quantity of offers does not automatically increase our commitment. The available time is not correlated to the amount of content. The numerous forms of branded content are often creative, but, at their core they lack meaning. For instance, every day my father used to tell me that I should turn off the lights when I leave the house. I understood the message—he was interested in saving energy. But it did not reach me. It had no meaning for me, because I didn’t have to pay and I thought, how expensive could electricity be? If you want someone’s commitment, you have to create meaning and not repeat insignificance.

Read the full article.

 

"The actual time at our disposal is only used for the things that have meaning to us."

Little Black Book Online

By: Mathias Staar
Head of Strategic Planning, Havas Düsseldorf

March 14, 2018

 

Do you really have time for this article? You may simply take the time to read it because you expect it to be of some use. Well, thank you very much for that, because I can imagine how limited your time is.

Our days are full of activities that are important, or that we at least consider important. Curiously, the older we get, the further we climb up the career ladder, the more things pull at us, the more our days get crowded, and the less time we have. The actual time at our disposal is only used for the things that have meaning to us—because our time is finite.

So it’s no wonder that we think very carefully about which brands we give our time to. And yet, it is surprising that as a consequence, most people wouldn’t care if three out of four brands completely disappeared. Yes, you heard that correctly, 74% of all brands.

The reason for this is simple: These brands are meaningless. They’re simply not worth sacrificing our time, because their messages are superficial. Choosing these brands would inevitably be a decision against one of the many alternatives that we consider to be meaningful. So, brands face a meaningful competition with “content” of all kinds: conversations with our family, a new series on Netflix, walking the dog, or our favorite influencer vlog.

This has two clear consequences for marketing and communication:

1. Too much does not help too much: The quantity of offers does not automatically increase our commitment. The available time is not correlated to the amount of content. The numerous forms of branded content are often creative, but, at their core they lack meaning. For instance, every day my father used to tell me that I should turn off the lights when I leave the house. I understood the message—he was interested in saving energy. But it did not reach me. It had no meaning for me, because I didn’t have to pay and I thought, how expensive could electricity be? If you want someone’s commitment, you have to create meaning and not repeat insignificance.

Read the full article.

 

With comprehensive experience in creative planning and strategic marketing, his work includes Reckitt Benckiser, Henkel, Deutsche Bank and Peugeot.

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