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Authenticity is the Only Way to Go

Authenticity is the Only Way to Go

Kenny Yap

Kenny Yap

January 31, 2019

Never abuse the trust earned with your tribe—you'll never get it back.

Mumbrella Asia

By Kenny Yap
General Manager of Social and PR, Havas Group Singapore

January 31, 2019

 

While the Fyre music festival was disastrous, it has certainly provided the fodder for two successful documentaries on streaming platforms – Netflix and Hulu.

Directed by Chris Smith, Fyre: The Greatest Party That Never Happened(the Netflix film) offered a closer look at what went on behind the scenes, and how Fyre masterminds Billy McFarland and Ja Rule came to be in the eye of the storm.

For the uninitiated, the event was launched as a “luxury music festival on a private island once owned by Pablo Escobar” (it wasn’t, by the way) created with the intent of promoting the Fyre music artist-booking app.

A bevy of influencers with huge social media followings including celebrities like Kendall Jenner and Bella Hadid were roped in to promote an onslaught of slickly-made promo videos, images, and social media posts.

They promised a utopian picture of the greatest party on earth. But it all went horribly wrong and utopia quickly transformed into a nightmare when those who had paid for tickets landed at the festival. The customers faced serious inadequacies when it came to security, food, accommodation and the lack of actual performers. Of course, this resulted in the festival being infamously canceled once the guests were already there.

The whole episode clearly demonstrated the power of social media influencers and key opinion leaders, but at the same time showed how influencers can also play their part in epic failures. It really boils down to the fundamental principle of trust and authenticity. Without a doubt, this was lacking on all sides.

Expectation versus reality

Brands (and all other stakeholders engaged) have a responsibility to communicate these offerings truthfully and not misrepresent the facts. To be fair in the case of Fyre, the celebrities and influencers engaged may not have had an accurate picture painted to them by the organizers.

That said, as events unfolded, they should have been responsible enough to address the concerns of their fans—who trusted them and were led to believe in what they were selling.

 

Read the full article

Mumbrella Asia

By Kenny Yap
General Manager of Social and PR, Havas Group Singapore

January 31, 2019

 

While the Fyre music festival was disastrous, it has certainly provided the fodder for two successful documentaries on streaming platforms – Netflix and Hulu.

Directed by Chris Smith, Fyre: The Greatest Party That Never Happened(the Netflix film) offered a closer look at what went on behind the scenes, and how Fyre masterminds Billy McFarland and Ja Rule came to be in the eye of the storm.

For the uninitiated, the event was launched as a “luxury music festival on a private island once owned by Pablo Escobar” (it wasn’t, by the way) created with the intent of promoting the Fyre music artist-booking app.

A bevy of influencers with huge social media followings including celebrities like Kendall Jenner and Bella Hadid were roped in to promote an onslaught of slickly-made promo videos, images, and social media posts.

They promised a utopian picture of the greatest party on earth. But it all went horribly wrong and utopia quickly transformed into a nightmare when those who had paid for tickets landed at the festival. The customers faced serious inadequacies when it came to security, food, accommodation and the lack of actual performers. Of course, this resulted in the festival being infamously canceled once the guests were already there.

The whole episode clearly demonstrated the power of social media influencers and key opinion leaders, but at the same time showed how influencers can also play their part in epic failures. It really boils down to the fundamental principle of trust and authenticity. Without a doubt, this was lacking on all sides.

Expectation versus reality

Brands (and all other stakeholders engaged) have a responsibility to communicate these offerings truthfully and not misrepresent the facts. To be fair in the case of Fyre, the celebrities and influencers engaged may not have had an accurate picture painted to them by the organizers.

That said, as events unfolded, they should have been responsible enough to address the concerns of their fans—who trusted them and were led to believe in what they were selling.

 

Read the full article

Kenny Yap leads PR and Social at Havas, responsible for developing integrated communications strategies as well as conceptualizing innovative ideas.

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