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Gen Z Talks Social Media

Gen Z Talks Social Media

Natasha Smith

Natasha Smith

January 16, 2019

And they are beyond candid.

"Nowadays, social media isn’t only about people’s lives; it’s honestly quite educational if you follow the right accounts."

Mike Amour, Chairman & CEO at Havas Group APAC, surveys the kids in his life to get a gauge on how the post-Millennial generation views social media.

 

Having observed families together over the last couple of weeks, supposedly spending “quality” bonding time, it struck me once again that the more technology and apps we have available to connect us, the less connected we are becoming physically and emotionally.

Rather than default to my own almost certainly biased opinion, I thought it might be interesting to ask a few teens (OK, I confessit was my own two kids and three stepchildren, all aged 16 through 21) for their points of view.

I asked two simple questions.

One: “What is the best thing about social media in your, and your friends’, view?” And, two: “In your view, what’s the worst thing about social media?”

I’ll let their collective answers tell the story.

 

The best things about social media:

Being able to easily communicate and interact with friends, celebrities, etc.—and see what they’re doing in their day-to-day lives, and how they interact with other people. Nowadays, social media isn’t only about people’s lives; it’s honestly quite educational if you follow the right accounts.

The worst things about social media:

People hiding behind a screen. The first thing you do when you wake up is to check social media, and people always put their best moments on there to make people jealous. You never see their true selves, how they’re feeling if they’re depressed. People only post a snippet that makes them look good. It kind of gives an unrealistic view of people’s supposedly perfect lives, which are mostly unattainable.

Ask people hiding behind a screen, and they will say as much sh*t as they want because they know nothing will happen to them, whether they’re being racist, homophobic, or whatever.

I don’t know about you, but it’s the answer to the second question that got to me. Perhaps these aren’t new perspectives. But they are very different from how many of us adults think. And these kids are our future, so they are definitely worth listening to.

"Nowadays, social media isn’t only about people’s lives; it’s honestly quite educational if you follow the right accounts."

Mike Amour, Chairman & CEO at Havas Group APAC, surveys the kids in his life to get a gauge on how the post-Millennial generation views social media.

 

Having observed families together over the last couple of weeks, supposedly spending “quality” bonding time, it struck me once again that the more technology and apps we have available to connect us, the less connected we are becoming physically and emotionally.

Rather than default to my own almost certainly biased opinion, I thought it might be interesting to ask a few teens (OK, I confessit was my own two kids and three stepchildren, all aged 16 through 21) for their points of view.

I asked two simple questions.

One: “What is the best thing about social media in your, and your friends’, view?” And, two: “In your view, what’s the worst thing about social media?”

I’ll let their collective answers tell the story.

 

The best things about social media:

Being able to easily communicate and interact with friends, celebrities, etc.—and see what they’re doing in their day-to-day lives, and how they interact with other people. Nowadays, social media isn’t only about people’s lives; it’s honestly quite educational if you follow the right accounts.

The worst things about social media:

People hiding behind a screen. The first thing you do when you wake up is to check social media, and people always put their best moments on there to make people jealous. You never see their true selves, how they’re feeling if they’re depressed. People only post a snippet that makes them look good. It kind of gives an unrealistic view of people’s supposedly perfect lives, which are mostly unattainable.

Ask people hiding behind a screen, and they will say as much sh*t as they want because they know nothing will happen to them, whether they’re being racist, homophobic, or whatever.

I don’t know about you, but it’s the answer to the second question that got to me. Perhaps these aren’t new perspectives. But they are very different from how many of us adults think. And these kids are our future, so they are definitely worth listening to.

Natasha Smith is the strategic communications manager for Havas Group. She happily represents 404 in the 212.

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