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CES 2020: The Peaks and the Pits

CES 2020: The Peaks and the Pits

Havas Global Comms

Havas Global Comms

January 15, 2020

Havas Media NA team on what worked and what didn’t at this year’s tech conference.

"We rarely focus on drones and robots for good, and that was the focal point of CES 2020"

CES 2020 is a wrap—and while the annual tech trade show can be predictable, there are always tons of exciting products and innovations to be marveled at. Others, not so much. The Havas Media NA team shares what worked and what didn’t on the show floor at the Las Vegas Convention Center.

Peaks

The Blurred Lines of Software and Hardware

One can’t exist without the other, but CES 2020 demonstrated that the line delineating between the two is blurring. Companies like Sony and Bosch took their software into the hardware space, both releasing autonomous vehicles. And for every 8K screen showcased on the floor, one could find the logos for Hulu, Netflix, and Amazon Prime alongside it. True, one cannot exist without the other, but consumers are demanding a fluidity between the two that has not been seen previously.

Drones and Robots for Good

The media wants us to fear drones and robots. Why? Because drones invade personal privacy. Drones can’t be properly regulated. Robots will take away human jobs. Robots will take over the world. We rarely focus on drones and robots for good, and that was the focal point of CES 2020. How can we leverage drones to put out wildfires? To eliminate waste in the ocean? How can we use robots to aid and service humans? To process recycling more effectively? CES envisions a future of multiplicity, in which diverse groups of humans and machines work together to solve 21st century challenges. Therefore, it’s a very exciting time.

'Mercedes-Benz Vision AVTR is like it's straight out of the movie Avatar, and it operates by detecting your pulse through the biometric connection"

Peaks

Automotive and Transportation

This year at CES, the Automotive and Transportation category took precedence in my eyes. Between the Lamborghini with Alexa integration (#swoon) and the flying taxi a.k.a S-AI from Hyundai/Uber, the future of transportation is looking very bright.

Pandora Making Waves

While many CES attendees skipped meetings they could “have had in New York,” my colleagues and I decided to attend Pandora’s interactive presentation Making Waves. Leading us through the history of sound, Pandora explored how noise can spark emotions, memories, and, ultimately, brand identity. Did you know less than 2% of brands have a sonic identity compared with almost 100% of brands with a visual identity? Sound is virtually an untapped resource when it comes to branding, which makes a strong case for advertising within the audio space.

Pits

Same Old, Same Old

The big players at CES have been showcasing the same technology for a few years now, and while products like the LG’s Rollable TV are certainly impressive, I was a little disappointed its display was exactly the same as last year.

      Jess Santini, Associate Director, Marketing and Communications 

Peaks

The Car of the Future?

Mercedes-Benz Vision AVTR is one of the most futuristic-looking car models at CES. Although I was only able to see a small glimpse through a curtain, one of the Mercedes staffers offered to take a picture of the car with my phone. Made from vegan material, the concept of this car is sustainability, a huge theme that transpired throughout the CES floor. The car looks like it’s straight out of the movie Avatar, and it operates by detecting your pulse through the biometric connection. Pretty cool, if you ask me.

Sero-ious TV

Designed to flip to portrait mode, this TV was one of the more experiential moments at CES. “Designed for the mobile generation,” it allows you to rotate the screen back and forth for your viewing pleasure. Although there is no mount for this design, the stand is on wheels and tilts back slightly.

Pits

Too Much, Too Little Time

Between tours of the floor, client and partner meetings, and all of the fun dinners and parties, there was just not enough time at CES. Unfortunately, schedules did not allow for things like the Sands Hotel, panels, or all-partner activations.

      Briana Comerford, Marketing and Communications Specialist

"We rarely focus on drones and robots for good, and that was the focal point of CES 2020"

CES 2020 is a wrap—and while the annual tech trade show can be predictable, there are always tons of exciting products and innovations to be marveled at. Others, not so much. The Havas Media NA team shares what worked and what didn’t on the show floor at the Las Vegas Convention Center.

Peaks

The Blurred Lines of Software and Hardware

One can’t exist without the other, but CES 2020 demonstrated that the line delineating between the two is blurring. Companies like Sony and Bosch took their software into the hardware space, both releasing autonomous vehicles. And for every 8K screen showcased on the floor, one could find the logos for Hulu, Netflix, and Amazon Prime alongside it. True, one cannot exist without the other, but consumers are demanding a fluidity between the two that has not been seen previously.

Drones and Robots for Good

The media wants us to fear drones and robots. Why? Because drones invade personal privacy. Drones can’t be properly regulated. Robots will take away human jobs. Robots will take over the world. We rarely focus on drones and robots for good, and that was the focal point of CES 2020. How can we leverage drones to put out wildfires? To eliminate waste in the ocean? How can we use robots to aid and service humans? To process recycling more effectively? CES envisions a future of multiplicity, in which diverse groups of humans and machines work together to solve 21st century challenges. Therefore, it’s a very exciting time.

'Mercedes-Benz Vision AVTR is like it's straight out of the movie Avatar, and it operates by detecting your pulse through the biometric connection"

Peaks

Automotive and Transportation

This year at CES, the Automotive and Transportation category took precedence in my eyes. Between the Lamborghini with Alexa integration (#swoon) and the flying taxi a.k.a S-AI from Hyundai/Uber, the future of transportation is looking very bright.

Pandora Making Waves

While many CES attendees skipped meetings they could “have had in New York,” my colleagues and I decided to attend Pandora’s interactive presentation Making Waves. Leading us through the history of sound, Pandora explored how noise can spark emotions, memories, and, ultimately, brand identity. Did you know less than 2% of brands have a sonic identity compared with almost 100% of brands with a visual identity? Sound is virtually an untapped resource when it comes to branding, which makes a strong case for advertising within the audio space.

Pits

Same Old, Same Old

The big players at CES have been showcasing the same technology for a few years now, and while products like the LG’s Rollable TV are certainly impressive, I was a little disappointed its display was exactly the same as last year.

      Jess Santini, Associate Director, Marketing and Communications 

Peaks

The Car of the Future?

Mercedes-Benz Vision AVTR is one of the most futuristic-looking car models at CES. Although I was only able to see a small glimpse through a curtain, one of the Mercedes staffers offered to take a picture of the car with my phone. Made from vegan material, the concept of this car is sustainability, a huge theme that transpired throughout the CES floor. The car looks like it’s straight out of the movie Avatar, and it operates by detecting your pulse through the biometric connection. Pretty cool, if you ask me.

Sero-ious TV

Designed to flip to portrait mode, this TV was one of the more experiential moments at CES. “Designed for the mobile generation,” it allows you to rotate the screen back and forth for your viewing pleasure. Although there is no mount for this design, the stand is on wheels and tilts back slightly.

Pits

Too Much, Too Little Time

Between tours of the floor, client and partner meetings, and all of the fun dinners and parties, there was just not enough time at CES. Unfortunately, schedules did not allow for things like the Sands Hotel, panels, or all-partner activations.

      Briana Comerford, Marketing and Communications Specialist

One of the world’s largest global communications groups, Havas is committed to creating a meaningful difference to brands, businesses, and people.

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