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CANNES 2019: Our Jurors Talk Creativity

CANNES 2019: Our Jurors Talk Creativity

Sulaiman Beg

Sulaiman Beg

June 17, 2019

How do Cannes jurors pick the work that works? Our judges share their thoughts on creativity and its future.

"I judge from the chills it sends down my back."

Cannes Lions is the Festival of Creativity. And this week creative leaders from around the world—including eight from the Havas Group networks—are making the tough decisions to choose the best of the best. Their expertise and experience in creating and breathing life into successful creative ideas give them the credibility and opportunity to determine the best work in the industry. Below they share their perspective on creativity and what the future looks like for the ad industry.

  

Finish this sentence: Creativity is…

Clare Hutchinson, Executive Strategy Director, Havas London | Creative Effectiveness Juror: messy and addictive.

Augé Reichenberg, EVP, Chief Creative Officer, Havas Health & You | Health & Wellness Juror: …my (human) purpose.

Olivier Apers, Executive Creative Director, BETC Paris | Film Juror: the opposite of bad advertising.

Laura Florence, Executive Creative Director, Havas Health & You | Pharma Juror: vital.

Antoinette Beatson, Executive Creative Director, BETC Paris | Outdoor Juror: that tingling sensation you get when your body knows you are coming up with the idea a few seconds before it hits your brain.  

Jesús Lada, Chief Creative Officer, Havas Spain  | Direct Juror: everywhere. For example: If you run out of an ingredient while cooking pasta at home, creativity starts to happen.

Valerie Madon, Chairwoman and Chief Creative Officer, Havas Group Singapore | Brand Experience & Activation Juror:  …priceless.

 

What’s the next big trend in advertising?

Florence: Purpose and the female perspective.

Reichenberg: This may sound trite, but I believe this is what’s next: experiential Video or interactive Video—on a global scale. As video online rises to the previous level of TV’s ubiquity, we will see more video, less static posts or banners and tons of experiential video with which a person can directly interact for a customized experience. While this happens in pockets now, I believe it will become a full-on trend.

Apers: The responsibility for each commercial brand to act for a better society and to protect the planet.

Beatson: Politics. Because of environmental and social issues, brands will have to start taking sides more, like Nike’s Dream Crazy with Colin Kaepernick.

Madon: More strategic partnerships and blurring of line with the real world with content platforms like Spotify, Netflix, IGTV and even lifestyle brands like fashion, hotels etc. It’s brand building through experiences beyond what we see today.

"Work that makes my heart beat faster and sometimes even shed a tear of joy as it reminds me why I’m still in this business."

What, to you, defines a successful creative idea?

Florence: Those that can actually change people’s lives.

Reichenberg: The most important component of a successful idea is simple: It’s the human component. A piece has to reach beyond any screen or device and make me feel something profound. When an idea has human purpose, it can emotionally move a person. And when moved, a person is more likely to act. Perhaps even change their mind, or their life, forever.

Beatson: When it’s conversational, controversial and when you can’t go back on it. There is an immediate before and after effect. How did we live before “Just do it”?

Lada: An idea that moves you from the inside. That makes you think, laugh, cry…for me that is a successful idea.

Madon: One that has made a difference in the world and people talks about, in a good way.

 

What’s your “I wish I had thought of that” idea and why?

Florence: Nike’s campaign Dream Crazier. Especially the Serena Williams spot. And the BETC Paris campaign for Lacoste’s “Life is a beautiful sport.”

Beatson: Last year’s Samsung’s ostrich TVC for the concept, the craft and above all for the brilliant line: “We make what can’t be made so you can do what can’t be done. Do what you can’t.”  

This year’s E.V.A. Initiative by Volvo for sharing their research with the rest of the car industry.

Hutchinson: “Melanoma Likes Me,” a winner a few years back.

Lada: Every year there are a bunch of those. One of my all-time favorites is Nike’s “Write the future.” Love the idea, love the execution. Palau Pledge is one of those as well. Simple but so strong. Again, an idea that moved me. Both create different emotions in me. Love it.

Madon: Still “Fearless Girl.” Still gives me goosebumps because it’s so meaningful yet so fresh and unexpected. It’s a good reminder that if “advertising” can be a statue, it can be anything.

 

How do you spot Cannes-winning work?

Reichenberg: It’s work that can be described in just two words: SIMPLE yet soooooo SMART.

Apers: I judge from the chills it sends down my back.

Hutchinson: It inspires jealousy.

Lada: There are some ideas that you just can tell. Big ideas, that change things. Like you said before, those “I wish I had thought of that” kind of ideas. Easy to spot. Then there is a lot of middle ground. Good ideas with so-so production, or great productions with an average idea…ideas that sound familiar, or just not that new, or ideas that you can see only matter to us (ad people). At the end of the day, you need to trust your gut.

Madon: Work that makes my heart beat faster and sometimes even shed a tear of joy as it reminds me why I’m still in this business.

"I judge from the chills it sends down my back."

Cannes Lions is the Festival of Creativity. And this week creative leaders from around the world—including eight from the Havas Group networks—are making the tough decisions to choose the best of the best. Their expertise and experience in creating and breathing life into successful creative ideas give them the credibility and opportunity to determine the best work in the industry. Below they share their perspective on creativity and what the future looks like for the ad industry.

  

Finish this sentence: Creativity is…

Clare Hutchinson, Executive Strategy Director, Havas London | Creative Effectiveness Juror: messy and addictive.

Augé Reichenberg, EVP, Chief Creative Officer, Havas Health & You | Health & Wellness Juror: …my (human) purpose.

Olivier Apers, Executive Creative Director, BETC Paris | Film Juror: the opposite of bad advertising.

Laura Florence, Executive Creative Director, Havas Health & You | Pharma Juror: vital.

Antoinette Beatson, Executive Creative Director, BETC Paris | Outdoor Juror: that tingling sensation you get when your body knows you are coming up with the idea a few seconds before it hits your brain.  

Jesús Lada, Chief Creative Officer, Havas Spain  | Direct Juror: everywhere. For example: If you run out of an ingredient while cooking pasta at home, creativity starts to happen.

Valerie Madon, Chairwoman and Chief Creative Officer, Havas Group Singapore | Brand Experience & Activation Juror:  …priceless.

 

What’s the next big trend in advertising?

Florence: Purpose and the female perspective.

Reichenberg: This may sound trite, but I believe this is what’s next: experiential Video or interactive Video—on a global scale. As video online rises to the previous level of TV’s ubiquity, we will see more video, less static posts or banners and tons of experiential video with which a person can directly interact for a customized experience. While this happens in pockets now, I believe it will become a full-on trend.

Apers: The responsibility for each commercial brand to act for a better society and to protect the planet.

Beatson: Politics. Because of environmental and social issues, brands will have to start taking sides more, like Nike’s Dream Crazy with Colin Kaepernick.

Madon: More strategic partnerships and blurring of line with the real world with content platforms like Spotify, Netflix, IGTV and even lifestyle brands like fashion, hotels etc. It’s brand building through experiences beyond what we see today.

"Work that makes my heart beat faster and sometimes even shed a tear of joy as it reminds me why I’m still in this business."

What, to you, defines a successful creative idea?

Florence: Those that can actually change people’s lives.

Reichenberg: The most important component of a successful idea is simple: It’s the human component. A piece has to reach beyond any screen or device and make me feel something profound. When an idea has human purpose, it can emotionally move a person. And when moved, a person is more likely to act. Perhaps even change their mind, or their life, forever.

Beatson: When it’s conversational, controversial and when you can’t go back on it. There is an immediate before and after effect. How did we live before “Just do it”?

Lada: An idea that moves you from the inside. That makes you think, laugh, cry…for me that is a successful idea.

Madon: One that has made a difference in the world and people talks about, in a good way.

 

What’s your “I wish I had thought of that” idea and why?

Florence: Nike’s campaign Dream Crazier. Especially the Serena Williams spot. And the BETC Paris campaign for Lacoste’s “Life is a beautiful sport.”

Beatson: Last year’s Samsung’s ostrich TVC for the concept, the craft and above all for the brilliant line: “We make what can’t be made so you can do what can’t be done. Do what you can’t.”  

This year’s E.V.A. Initiative by Volvo for sharing their research with the rest of the car industry.

Hutchinson: “Melanoma Likes Me,” a winner a few years back.

Lada: Every year there are a bunch of those. One of my all-time favorites is Nike’s “Write the future.” Love the idea, love the execution. Palau Pledge is one of those as well. Simple but so strong. Again, an idea that moved me. Both create different emotions in me. Love it.

Madon: Still “Fearless Girl.” Still gives me goosebumps because it’s so meaningful yet so fresh and unexpected. It’s a good reminder that if “advertising” can be a statue, it can be anything.

 

How do you spot Cannes-winning work?

Reichenberg: It’s work that can be described in just two words: SIMPLE yet soooooo SMART.

Apers: I judge from the chills it sends down my back.

Hutchinson: It inspires jealousy.

Lada: There are some ideas that you just can tell. Big ideas, that change things. Like you said before, those “I wish I had thought of that” kind of ideas. Easy to spot. Then there is a lot of middle ground. Good ideas with so-so production, or great productions with an average idea…ideas that sound familiar, or just not that new, or ideas that you can see only matter to us (ad people). At the end of the day, you need to trust your gut.

Madon: Work that makes my heart beat faster and sometimes even shed a tear of joy as it reminds me why I’m still in this business.

Sulaiman Beg is Havas' Director of Global Internal Communications. He has never eaten canned tuna fish.

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