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Cannes 2019: Inside the Palais - Day 3

Cannes 2019: Inside the Palais - Day 3

Danielle Smith

Danielle Smith

June 19, 2019

The “outsiders,” connecting through experiences, Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg and putting the “humanity” back in “creativity”

"We get the privilege of studying humanity and finding ways to inspire it. That must mean we are in the game of people."

10:30: The Outsiders: Understanding Culture, Harnessing Perspective, Creating Change

The feeling of being an outsider is often something tempting to avoid. However, this perspective can provide a new lens from which to create and act as a catalyst for change. Day three at the Palais started with a conversation between three self-proclaimed outsiders to the world of advertising, Sophia Bush, actress, activist, and entrepreneur, T-Mobile Executive Vice President of Marketing Experience Nick Drake, and Neuro-Insight US CEO Pranav Yadav discussing the value of seeing the world through others’ perspective.

The trio met in years past at Cannes and wanted to come together for a panel at the festival to outline how their experience outside the advertising industry led them to success working inside the industry.

“The world is marketing…we’re figuring out how to properly tell the story of what it is we’re offering, making, and putting out into the world,” Bush said while speaking of her background in theatre and studying journalism.

Drake got his start in advertising after an injury cut his career in sport short. He used his experience as a rugby player to inform his start in sports marketing coming at the industry with fresh eyes. For the last four years, he’s been an integral part of creating the self-described turn-around story at T-Mobile going from 33 million to 80 million customers today, and adding over a million customers a quarter for the last 7 years.

“We get the privilege of studying humanity and finding ways to inspire it. That must mean we are in the game of people,” Drake said.

Yadav shared how he used creativity to get an interview with a university that he called his “ticket to America” when he was able to move from where he grew up in India. He said “the human brain is a pattern-seeking, storytelling device. Your culture is your brain’s operating system.”

Yadav ended the panel with encouragement to everyone that there is no barrier to creativity. “No one has the right to creativity, everyone does,” he said. “Let’s imagine the best world we can dream of. And let’s build it because there is no other way it’s going to happen.”

 

11:15: Sparking Authentic Human Connection in a [Dis]Connected World

Panels that start with concerts are the best panels. British singer-songwriter, Tom Odell got the audience connected with his heartfelt lyrics and witty between-song banter. Then Jon Haber, co-founder of Giant Spoon, Julia Hartz, co-founder and CEO of Eventbrite, and Rafe Offer, founder of SoFar Sounds, joined him on stage for a talk about authentic connections moderated by Axios Media reporter Sara Fischer.

The conversation centered around experiences and the ubiquity of creating them as a way to capture customers and bring recognition to brands.=

“There is nothing digital that can reproduce that feeling,” said Hartz, referring to how she teared up at the end of the last song Odell played for the audience. “Research around consumers and live experience shows us consumers find purpose in the connection that they have experienced with others within that event,” she said.

It’s interesting, and a bit ironic, that there is an undeniable uptick in the desire and effectiveness of real experiences in an overwhelmingly digital world. “I think people just want to feel human,” said Offer. Odell added: “The younger generation thinks the way my generation uses social media is completely uncool. They use it differently and maybe more healthfully.”

Odell, who is 28, said that as the first generation to grow up with screens in their pockets, millennials are the ones who’ve experienced the most damage from digital addiction.

“It’s not about scale it’s about the quality of the experience that’s driving the growth,” Hartz said. Haber agreed, adding his take as an expert in created experiential theatre and immersive experience at Giant Spoon. “The events are a catalyst and a moment, but really you have to think of what builds around it.”

"Make sure you have a diverse group of people you’re listening to because you need diverse perspectives to make the best products."

1:00pm: Sheryl Sandberg in Conversation

Next up, Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg took a seat on the Lumiere Theatre stage with Bloomberg’s Caroline Hyde to discuss everything from her work to empower women in business, digital tech’s role in society considering the worldwide revolution in data privacy, and her personal and professional growth in leadership.

“For a long time at Facebook we’ve been focusing on public sharing, but now people are communicating more like a living room than a town hall,” Sandberg said. She discussed the future of targeted ads, admitting that Facebook needs to do a better job of explaining their business model when it comes to advertisements because it’s a problem of understanding that makes people feel like targeted ads are creepy.

Hyde asked about the recent Facebook-Cambridge Analytica scandal that highlighted issues with data privacy and sharing.

“Look, this has been hard,” Sandberg said. “Being attacked is hard, but I think it should be hard because we have a really big responsibility.” She spoke about the changes Facebook has made internally to address data sharing and election interference going forward. “We know that we are doing better, we’ve seen it. And we know that new threats have been, and are being invented and we have to be vigilant.”

Continuing to look future forward, Sandberg said, “new rules need to be made for the internet and we want to help make that happen,” adding details about ways Facebook is partnering with governments worldwide to improve data privacy legislation like GDPR.

“Mark [Zuckerberg] and I want to run the company differently and part of that is becoming more global and hiring diverse people to work for us,” she said. “We’re a technology company, but we’re a technology company that wants to bring everyone along.”

This week Facebook announced a new cryptocurrency called Libra and its participation as a member of the Libra Association. The association will promote the Libra Blockchain, an open-sourced digital currency that promotes financial inclusion.

Sandberg offered statistics about the lack of access to the internet and financial institutions around the globe. According to Sandberg, there are 4 billion people worldwide who don’t have access to the internet, and there are 100 million women in the world who are sending remittance payments home at the expense of high transfer fees.

“We’d like to help there be a cryptocurrency that is more inclusive,” Sanberg said adding that Libra is the first step in making it happen. The association is not run by or reporting to Facebook and data about purchases made with Libra will not be tracked and used for advertisements.

Things then got personal and Sandberg talked about how she has grown after the death of her husband and the drama surrounding Facebook. “You grow from things that are hard. I think I’m growing as a leader and person from the Facebook challenges as well,” she said. “I try to grow and learn, and try to take something and make it better.”

Sandberg said she is more committed to Facebook now than ever looking at her job as a responsibility to prevent the bad so the good that Facebook does can keep happening. “At it’s very best what Facebook does is make the invisible, visible.”

Sandberg ended the panel with a challenge to the creative community to tackle issues of representation and diversity for women and the communities around the world. “This is the creative community, there has never been a better opportunity to change the representation of women around the world.”

 

3:00pm: Reimagine Creativity Through Love and Humanity

“The ad world doesn’t reflect the real world. It’s time for us to reimagine creativity to reinvent advertising,” said Marc Pritchard, Proctor and Gamble’s Chief Brand Officer, as he kicked off the last panel of the day at the Lumiere Theatre.  

Joining the conversation was journalist, activist, and entrepreneur Katie Couric and award-winning musician, John Legend.

“Maybe I’m insane but I like to work really hard and I love what I’ve done throughout the world,” Couric said of her 30+ year career. “I wanted to evolve with the times.”

She added: “Increasingly people are looking to companies and CEOs to change the world, as trust in government declines the responsibility is on companies to lead the way.”

Legend addressed representation in advertising and shared personal anecdotes about racism and discrimination he experienced in college as a black male. “In the back of our minds, and maybe even close to the front of our minds, we’re thinking about the values of the company we want to spend our money with,” he said.

“We don’t help anybody by not addressing our bias. It’s ok to have a conversation without feeling attacked,” Legend said.

Couric ended the conversation urging the audience and the larger creative community to, “make sure you have a diverse group of people you’re listening to because you need diverse perspectives to make the best products.”

Legend performed two songs at the piano with lyrics reinforcing the conversation and harkening a more positive and inclusive future.

"We get the privilege of studying humanity and finding ways to inspire it. That must mean we are in the game of people."

10:30: The Outsiders: Understanding Culture, Harnessing Perspective, Creating Change

The feeling of being an outsider is often something tempting to avoid. However, this perspective can provide a new lens from which to create and act as a catalyst for change. Day three at the Palais started with a conversation between three self-proclaimed outsiders to the world of advertising, Sophia Bush, actress, activist, and entrepreneur, T-Mobile Executive Vice President of Marketing Experience Nick Drake, and Neuro-Insight US CEO Pranav Yadav discussing the value of seeing the world through others’ perspective.

The trio met in years past at Cannes and wanted to come together for a panel at the festival to outline how their experience outside the advertising industry led them to success working inside the industry.

“The world is marketing…we’re figuring out how to properly tell the story of what it is we’re offering, making, and putting out into the world,” Bush said while speaking of her background in theatre and studying journalism.

Drake got his start in advertising after an injury cut his career in sport short. He used his experience as a rugby player to inform his start in sports marketing coming at the industry with fresh eyes. For the last four years, he’s been an integral part of creating the self-described turn-around story at T-Mobile going from 33 million to 80 million customers today, and adding over a million customers a quarter for the last 7 years.

“We get the privilege of studying humanity and finding ways to inspire it. That must mean we are in the game of people,” Drake said.

Yadav shared how he used creativity to get an interview with a university that he called his “ticket to America” when he was able to move from where he grew up in India. He said “the human brain is a pattern-seeking, storytelling device. Your culture is your brain’s operating system.”

Yadav ended the panel with encouragement to everyone that there is no barrier to creativity. “No one has the right to creativity, everyone does,” he said. “Let’s imagine the best world we can dream of. And let’s build it because there is no other way it’s going to happen.”

 

11:15: Sparking Authentic Human Connection in a [Dis]Connected World

Panels that start with concerts are the best panels. British singer-songwriter, Tom Odell got the audience connected with his heartfelt lyrics and witty between-song banter. Then Jon Haber, co-founder of Giant Spoon, Julia Hartz, co-founder and CEO of Eventbrite, and Rafe Offer, founder of SoFar Sounds, joined him on stage for a talk about authentic connections moderated by Axios Media reporter Sara Fischer.

The conversation centered around experiences and the ubiquity of creating them as a way to capture customers and bring recognition to brands.=

“There is nothing digital that can reproduce that feeling,” said Hartz, referring to how she teared up at the end of the last song Odell played for the audience. “Research around consumers and live experience shows us consumers find purpose in the connection that they have experienced with others within that event,” she said.

It’s interesting, and a bit ironic, that there is an undeniable uptick in the desire and effectiveness of real experiences in an overwhelmingly digital world. “I think people just want to feel human,” said Offer. Odell added: “The younger generation thinks the way my generation uses social media is completely uncool. They use it differently and maybe more healthfully.”

Odell, who is 28, said that as the first generation to grow up with screens in their pockets, millennials are the ones who’ve experienced the most damage from digital addiction.

“It’s not about scale it’s about the quality of the experience that’s driving the growth,” Hartz said. Haber agreed, adding his take as an expert in created experiential theatre and immersive experience at Giant Spoon. “The events are a catalyst and a moment, but really you have to think of what builds around it.”

"Make sure you have a diverse group of people you’re listening to because you need diverse perspectives to make the best products."

1:00pm: Sheryl Sandberg in Conversation

Next up, Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg took a seat on the Lumiere Theatre stage with Bloomberg’s Caroline Hyde to discuss everything from her work to empower women in business, digital tech’s role in society considering the worldwide revolution in data privacy, and her personal and professional growth in leadership.

“For a long time at Facebook we’ve been focusing on public sharing, but now people are communicating more like a living room than a town hall,” Sandberg said. She discussed the future of targeted ads, admitting that Facebook needs to do a better job of explaining their business model when it comes to advertisements because it’s a problem of understanding that makes people feel like targeted ads are creepy.

Hyde asked about the recent Facebook-Cambridge Analytica scandal that highlighted issues with data privacy and sharing.

“Look, this has been hard,” Sandberg said. “Being attacked is hard, but I think it should be hard because we have a really big responsibility.” She spoke about the changes Facebook has made internally to address data sharing and election interference going forward. “We know that we are doing better, we’ve seen it. And we know that new threats have been, and are being invented and we have to be vigilant.”

Continuing to look future forward, Sandberg said, “new rules need to be made for the internet and we want to help make that happen,” adding details about ways Facebook is partnering with governments worldwide to improve data privacy legislation like GDPR.

“Mark [Zuckerberg] and I want to run the company differently and part of that is becoming more global and hiring diverse people to work for us,” she said. “We’re a technology company, but we’re a technology company that wants to bring everyone along.”

This week Facebook announced a new cryptocurrency called Libra and its participation as a member of the Libra Association. The association will promote the Libra Blockchain, an open-sourced digital currency that promotes financial inclusion.

Sandberg offered statistics about the lack of access to the internet and financial institutions around the globe. According to Sandberg, there are 4 billion people worldwide who don’t have access to the internet, and there are 100 million women in the world who are sending remittance payments home at the expense of high transfer fees.

“We’d like to help there be a cryptocurrency that is more inclusive,” Sanberg said adding that Libra is the first step in making it happen. The association is not run by or reporting to Facebook and data about purchases made with Libra will not be tracked and used for advertisements.

Things then got personal and Sandberg talked about how she has grown after the death of her husband and the drama surrounding Facebook. “You grow from things that are hard. I think I’m growing as a leader and person from the Facebook challenges as well,” she said. “I try to grow and learn, and try to take something and make it better.”

Sandberg said she is more committed to Facebook now than ever looking at her job as a responsibility to prevent the bad so the good that Facebook does can keep happening. “At it’s very best what Facebook does is make the invisible, visible.”

Sandberg ended the panel with a challenge to the creative community to tackle issues of representation and diversity for women and the communities around the world. “This is the creative community, there has never been a better opportunity to change the representation of women around the world.”

 

3:00pm: Reimagine Creativity Through Love and Humanity

“The ad world doesn’t reflect the real world. It’s time for us to reimagine creativity to reinvent advertising,” said Marc Pritchard, Proctor and Gamble’s Chief Brand Officer, as he kicked off the last panel of the day at the Lumiere Theatre.  

Joining the conversation was journalist, activist, and entrepreneur Katie Couric and award-winning musician, John Legend.

“Maybe I’m insane but I like to work really hard and I love what I’ve done throughout the world,” Couric said of her 30+ year career. “I wanted to evolve with the times.”

She added: “Increasingly people are looking to companies and CEOs to change the world, as trust in government declines the responsibility is on companies to lead the way.”

Legend addressed representation in advertising and shared personal anecdotes about racism and discrimination he experienced in college as a black male. “In the back of our minds, and maybe even close to the front of our minds, we’re thinking about the values of the company we want to spend our money with,” he said.

“We don’t help anybody by not addressing our bias. It’s ok to have a conversation without feeling attacked,” Legend said.

Couric ended the conversation urging the audience and the larger creative community to, “make sure you have a diverse group of people you’re listening to because you need diverse perspectives to make the best products.”

Legend performed two songs at the piano with lyrics reinforcing the conversation and harkening a more positive and inclusive future.

Danielle Smith is the Communications Manager of Havas Group. She’s believes every meal can be tacos if you have tortillas and the heart to try.

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