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Cannes 2018: Meet the Jurors - Wendeline Sassen

Cannes 2018: Meet the Jurors - Wendeline Sassen

Havas Global Comms

Havas Global Comms

June 18, 2018

"I hope to learn a lot from campaigns that create a relevant frame for sustainable choices. Campaigns that really alter behavior and even entire cultures."

"Cross boundaries—including your own."

The 65th Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity kicks off June 18, but for 413 people the festival is already under way.

Cannes Lions jurors will spends hours, if not days, locked in rooms reviewing the best creative work from around the world. This year’s juries are composed of people from 50 countries, including, for the first time, Georgia, Nigeria, Kenya, and Sri Lanka.

Eighteen judges will represent Havas Group, BETC, 18Labs, Rosapark, Cake, All Response Media, and Vivendi, including Marc Maleh, global director at Havas X, the jury president of this year’s Creative Data Lions jury.

We spoke with several jurors from the networks about what it’s like to be juror, how they define a successful creative idea, and the one thing they make sure to pack.

 

 

Wendeline Sassen
Strategic Director
Havas Lemz

 

Finish this sentence: Creativity is ____.

The answer to everything. It is the key to solving all problems, in this world and the next.

What do you see as the next big trend in the PR category?

PR agencies will focus on impactful creative ideas instead of mere reach. As PR agencies have the best sense of societal relevance and newsworthiness of an idea, their role in crafting the idea from the very beginning will become more and more important. As my jury president Stuart Smith put it brilliantly: “we now live in an earned-first world.”

What do you value most from the Cannes experience?

This is my first Cannes experience, so I am extremely excited to see loads of world-class, impactful ideas. Looking at the festival program, I am already living in constant fear of missing out.

What, to you, defines a successful creative idea?

I always use these five criteria, in this particular order:

  1. Meaningfulness does the idea have positive impact on the lives of people and society?
  2. Originality – is the idea innovative and newsworthy, without paid influencers?
  3. Fit with brand DNA – is the idea true to the heart of the brand?
  4. Craftsmanship – does the case show brilliant craftsmanship?
  5. Effectivity – are earned attention, media and influence linked to the brand? And does it create an attitude or behavioral change?

How do you spot Cannes-winning work?

From a mile away. By using the five criteria mentioned above. With “meaningfulness” as the most important driver.

What do you hope to learn while there?

I hope to learn how to win a Sustainable Development Goals Lion. To me, this new category is the most important one of all because it is about making an actual change for the good of mankind which demands the utmost of our creativity. To save the earth’s natural resources, we can not wait for governments to change policies, or innovations to help us make more sustainable choices. To save the planet we need to radically change our behavior ourselves. But changing behavior is difficult, especially when it means changing into a more sustainable lifestyle. I hope to learn a lot from campaigns that create a relevant frame for sustainable choices. Campaigns that really alter behavior and even entire cultures.

What’s an absolute must-do at Cannes?

Cross boundaries—including your own.

What’s the best campaign you’ve seen this year?

The best work I have seen is definitely “Make Friends.” The world’s most prominent religious leaders call on everyone to make friends across religions. The idea was initiated by Havas Lemz, Letsheal.org and Elijah Interfaith Institute.

When heading to Cannes, what’s the one thing you make sure to pack?

I got an extremely nice notebook from my dear colleague Pim Gerrits. It is from McSweeney’s Books.

What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

“Follow your fascinations.”

"Cross boundaries—including your own."

The 65th Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity kicks off June 18, but for 413 people the festival is already under way.

Cannes Lions jurors will spends hours, if not days, locked in rooms reviewing the best creative work from around the world. This year’s juries are composed of people from 50 countries, including, for the first time, Georgia, Nigeria, Kenya, and Sri Lanka.

Eighteen judges will represent Havas Group, BETC, 18Labs, Rosapark, Cake, All Response Media, and Vivendi, including Marc Maleh, global director at Havas X, the jury president of this year’s Creative Data Lions jury.

We spoke with several jurors from the networks about what it’s like to be juror, how they define a successful creative idea, and the one thing they make sure to pack.

 

 

Wendeline Sassen
Strategic Director
Havas Lemz

 

Finish this sentence: Creativity is ____.

The answer to everything. It is the key to solving all problems, in this world and the next.

What do you see as the next big trend in the PR category?

PR agencies will focus on impactful creative ideas instead of mere reach. As PR agencies have the best sense of societal relevance and newsworthiness of an idea, their role in crafting the idea from the very beginning will become more and more important. As my jury president Stuart Smith put it brilliantly: “we now live in an earned-first world.”

What do you value most from the Cannes experience?

This is my first Cannes experience, so I am extremely excited to see loads of world-class, impactful ideas. Looking at the festival program, I am already living in constant fear of missing out.

What, to you, defines a successful creative idea?

I always use these five criteria, in this particular order:

  1. Meaningfulness does the idea have positive impact on the lives of people and society?
  2. Originality – is the idea innovative and newsworthy, without paid influencers?
  3. Fit with brand DNA – is the idea true to the heart of the brand?
  4. Craftsmanship – does the case show brilliant craftsmanship?
  5. Effectivity – are earned attention, media and influence linked to the brand? And does it create an attitude or behavioral change?

How do you spot Cannes-winning work?

From a mile away. By using the five criteria mentioned above. With “meaningfulness” as the most important driver.

What do you hope to learn while there?

I hope to learn how to win a Sustainable Development Goals Lion. To me, this new category is the most important one of all because it is about making an actual change for the good of mankind which demands the utmost of our creativity. To save the earth’s natural resources, we can not wait for governments to change policies, or innovations to help us make more sustainable choices. To save the planet we need to radically change our behavior ourselves. But changing behavior is difficult, especially when it means changing into a more sustainable lifestyle. I hope to learn a lot from campaigns that create a relevant frame for sustainable choices. Campaigns that really alter behavior and even entire cultures.

What’s an absolute must-do at Cannes?

Cross boundaries—including your own.

What’s the best campaign you’ve seen this year?

The best work I have seen is definitely “Make Friends.” The world’s most prominent religious leaders call on everyone to make friends across religions. The idea was initiated by Havas Lemz, Letsheal.org and Elijah Interfaith Institute.

When heading to Cannes, what’s the one thing you make sure to pack?

I got an extremely nice notebook from my dear colleague Pim Gerrits. It is from McSweeney’s Books.

What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

“Follow your fascinations.”

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