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Cannes 2018: Meet the Jurors - Frederic Josue

Cannes 2018: Meet the Jurors - Frederic Josue

Havas Global Comms

Havas Global Comms

June 20, 2018

"The most brilliant campaigns come from a clever insight that create an emotional connection between the spectator and the brand, giving the feeling that this product was created specifically for me."

The 65th Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity kicked off June 18, but for 413 people the festival began much earlier.

Cannes Lions jurors will spends hours, if not days, locked in rooms reviewing the best creative work from around the world. This year’s juries are composed of people from 50 countries, including, for the first time, Georgia, Nigeria, Kenya, and Sri Lanka.

Eighteen judges will represent Havas Group, BETC, 18Labs, Rosapark, Cake, All Response Media, and Vivendi, including Marc Maleh, global director at Havas X, the jury president of this year’s Creative Data Lions jury.

We spoke with several jurors from the networks about what it’s like to be juror, how they define a successful creative idea, and the one thing they make sure to pack.

"I feel like culture and inspiration, goals and wishes, have never been so singular across regions."

Frederic Josue
Havas, Global Executive Advisor
Director, 18Havas.io

 

Finish this sentence: Creativity is _____.

A mix of context and intelligent observation.

What do you see as the next big trend in innovation?

The most brilliant brands are the ones that were able to leverage insights and transform them into useful tools and services for human beings. With that in mind, the most brilliant campaigns come from a clever insight that creates an emotional connection between the spectator and the brand, giving the feeling that this product was created specifically for me—me being the world population of more than seven and a half billion people.

Brands are slowly moving from an image standpoint to usage in a more human solution centered approach. There’s obviously a trend, it’s the connected cities, aka smart cities. Thanks to technology, we now have a massive amount of data, so we can specifically tailor the service in question directly to the consumer. Individuality is no longer a problem for a global brand.

This new trend of the brand that cares shines a light on various issues that are seen as wicked problems, like environmental, healthcare, social, political, or even organizational issues. Brands are now inclined to take up these causes alleviating the pressure for local governments, which, due to increasing public debt in all countries and the decrease of corporate income tax, find it hard to tackle these causes.

Remember what Laurence D. Fink, CEO of BlackRock, said “Your companies need to do more than make profits — they need to contribute to society as well if they want to receive the support of BlackRock.”

Its new way of thinking is key. Today most leading companies understand this. The new consumers, or “Millenials,” are asking for more engagement, more impact. There’s a reward for companies that design their marketing not on pricing their products, but on pricing the consumer. Most leading companies are now moving to impact investments, and we can see this in the cases that are proposed for the innovation prize. It’s not only communication or advertising, it’s a new business strategy. Listening to the consumer, thanks to data collection and leveraging these insights, is a clear opportunity to create sustainable businesses. That is what I can see. And that is in line with the research we do with USC Annenberg in Los Angeles.

What do you value most from the Cannes experience?

The world is a playground and even though technologies make us feel like space and time are shrinking, with this notion of a world becoming flat, I feel like culture and inspiration, goals and wishes, have never been so singular across regions. One common language is definitely the need to fix things. But this is done in a different way, giving people the tools to fix world issues, locally and globally in a decentralized manner. Governance and authority are shifting, and technologies, like IoT, Blockchain, are helping this move. Most companies are proposing bottom-up strategies that can include their employees as well as ordinary people. We are definitely moving toward a more inclusive world, and some marketers are paving the way.

"I really believe that creativity definitely has to impact human emotion."

What, to you, defines a successful creative idea?

Success is measured by positive impact. I feel for this to happen it needs to be “people driven” or “people oriented.” This concept is obviously connected to the notion of “usage.”

If you want to please your ego, you can write a book and even self-publish it. But apart from your mother, no one else will read it. Today a brand needs to make a positive difference. The impact the brand will make needs to touch the consumer on an emotional level. A good example is addressing issues of sustainability. Advertising has always been the armed wing of greenwashing. But today more than ever, we as consumers are weary of this form of communication and need to see hard evidence. As experts in communication, we must assist clients in this new venture to be true to their values and not try to reinvent themselves with the aim of selling more product.

Greater responsibility is demanded from all stakeholders. We cannot escape from these obligations. We must show leadership. And creatives are obviously leading the way. Among them, the agencies in the southern hemisphere are leading the way in creative innovation. I really believe that creativity definitely has to impact human emotion. Reach is not enough. Real engagement through interactions and impact is much more important. Prove that your creation finds real-world solution and has the ability to generate a positive impact on the surrounding population—then your brand can grow.

How do you spot Cannes-winning work?

Context and emotional connection to the world is what I am looking for. Purpose and impact. Look at brands like Patagonia, TOMS, or even Mastercard. Purpose and inclusion is deeply rooted into their strategy.

What do you hope to learn while there?

I’m always looking for new and innovative ways of creating a connection with the audience. I’m also looking for new ways to have an impact on and find solutions to human problems.

What’s an absolute must-do at Cannes?

Appreciate the beauty of the French Riviera while sipping a great espresso, eating a croissant around 6 am after a heavy night of networking with my peers and, maybe between meetings, finish the book I’m currently reading.

What’s the best campaign you’ve seen this year?

It’s the next one I will discover. For the moment, nothing has really blown my mind. Ford’s smart window that allows blind people to “feel” the view, thanks to haptics, is quite innovative. Landscape images are reproduced as a grayscale rendering in the window glass. When the blind passenger touches the window, the different shades of gray start vibrating (255 different frequencies), and he can feel the view…I think Ford is the most fascinating brands in terms of strategy and communication today. I’d love to meet James Hackett, by the way, if you have his cell….

When heading to Cannes, what’s the one thing you make sure to pack?

Earplugs! The hotel room walls are very thin in the south of France, and getting a good night’s sleep so that I may have a clear brain is important to me.

What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

“A good planner should never answer the question raised but follow his own rules”. – Jacques Séguéla 1999. In other words that is the thesis from R.M. Rilke in “Letters to a Young Poet,” a book that should be on bedside table of every creative, if creatives still read….

The 65th Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity kicked off June 18, but for 413 people the festival began much earlier.

Cannes Lions jurors will spends hours, if not days, locked in rooms reviewing the best creative work from around the world. This year’s juries are composed of people from 50 countries, including, for the first time, Georgia, Nigeria, Kenya, and Sri Lanka.

Eighteen judges will represent Havas Group, BETC, 18Labs, Rosapark, Cake, All Response Media, and Vivendi, including Marc Maleh, global director at Havas X, the jury president of this year’s Creative Data Lions jury.

We spoke with several jurors from the networks about what it’s like to be juror, how they define a successful creative idea, and the one thing they make sure to pack.

"I feel like culture and inspiration, goals and wishes, have never been so singular across regions."

Frederic Josue
Havas, Global Executive Advisor
Director, 18Havas.io

 

Finish this sentence: Creativity is _____.

A mix of context and intelligent observation.

What do you see as the next big trend in innovation?

The most brilliant brands are the ones that were able to leverage insights and transform them into useful tools and services for human beings. With that in mind, the most brilliant campaigns come from a clever insight that creates an emotional connection between the spectator and the brand, giving the feeling that this product was created specifically for me—me being the world population of more than seven and a half billion people.

Brands are slowly moving from an image standpoint to usage in a more human solution centered approach. There’s obviously a trend, it’s the connected cities, aka smart cities. Thanks to technology, we now have a massive amount of data, so we can specifically tailor the service in question directly to the consumer. Individuality is no longer a problem for a global brand.

This new trend of the brand that cares shines a light on various issues that are seen as wicked problems, like environmental, healthcare, social, political, or even organizational issues. Brands are now inclined to take up these causes alleviating the pressure for local governments, which, due to increasing public debt in all countries and the decrease of corporate income tax, find it hard to tackle these causes.

Remember what Laurence D. Fink, CEO of BlackRock, said “Your companies need to do more than make profits — they need to contribute to society as well if they want to receive the support of BlackRock.”

Its new way of thinking is key. Today most leading companies understand this. The new consumers, or “Millenials,” are asking for more engagement, more impact. There’s a reward for companies that design their marketing not on pricing their products, but on pricing the consumer. Most leading companies are now moving to impact investments, and we can see this in the cases that are proposed for the innovation prize. It’s not only communication or advertising, it’s a new business strategy. Listening to the consumer, thanks to data collection and leveraging these insights, is a clear opportunity to create sustainable businesses. That is what I can see. And that is in line with the research we do with USC Annenberg in Los Angeles.

What do you value most from the Cannes experience?

The world is a playground and even though technologies make us feel like space and time are shrinking, with this notion of a world becoming flat, I feel like culture and inspiration, goals and wishes, have never been so singular across regions. One common language is definitely the need to fix things. But this is done in a different way, giving people the tools to fix world issues, locally and globally in a decentralized manner. Governance and authority are shifting, and technologies, like IoT, Blockchain, are helping this move. Most companies are proposing bottom-up strategies that can include their employees as well as ordinary people. We are definitely moving toward a more inclusive world, and some marketers are paving the way.

"I really believe that creativity definitely has to impact human emotion."

What, to you, defines a successful creative idea?

Success is measured by positive impact. I feel for this to happen it needs to be “people driven” or “people oriented.” This concept is obviously connected to the notion of “usage.”

If you want to please your ego, you can write a book and even self-publish it. But apart from your mother, no one else will read it. Today a brand needs to make a positive difference. The impact the brand will make needs to touch the consumer on an emotional level. A good example is addressing issues of sustainability. Advertising has always been the armed wing of greenwashing. But today more than ever, we as consumers are weary of this form of communication and need to see hard evidence. As experts in communication, we must assist clients in this new venture to be true to their values and not try to reinvent themselves with the aim of selling more product.

Greater responsibility is demanded from all stakeholders. We cannot escape from these obligations. We must show leadership. And creatives are obviously leading the way. Among them, the agencies in the southern hemisphere are leading the way in creative innovation. I really believe that creativity definitely has to impact human emotion. Reach is not enough. Real engagement through interactions and impact is much more important. Prove that your creation finds real-world solution and has the ability to generate a positive impact on the surrounding population—then your brand can grow.

How do you spot Cannes-winning work?

Context and emotional connection to the world is what I am looking for. Purpose and impact. Look at brands like Patagonia, TOMS, or even Mastercard. Purpose and inclusion is deeply rooted into their strategy.

What do you hope to learn while there?

I’m always looking for new and innovative ways of creating a connection with the audience. I’m also looking for new ways to have an impact on and find solutions to human problems.

What’s an absolute must-do at Cannes?

Appreciate the beauty of the French Riviera while sipping a great espresso, eating a croissant around 6 am after a heavy night of networking with my peers and, maybe between meetings, finish the book I’m currently reading.

What’s the best campaign you’ve seen this year?

It’s the next one I will discover. For the moment, nothing has really blown my mind. Ford’s smart window that allows blind people to “feel” the view, thanks to haptics, is quite innovative. Landscape images are reproduced as a grayscale rendering in the window glass. When the blind passenger touches the window, the different shades of gray start vibrating (255 different frequencies), and he can feel the view…I think Ford is the most fascinating brands in terms of strategy and communication today. I’d love to meet James Hackett, by the way, if you have his cell….

When heading to Cannes, what’s the one thing you make sure to pack?

Earplugs! The hotel room walls are very thin in the south of France, and getting a good night’s sleep so that I may have a clear brain is important to me.

What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

“A good planner should never answer the question raised but follow his own rules”. – Jacques Séguéla 1999. In other words that is the thesis from R.M. Rilke in “Letters to a Young Poet,” a book that should be on bedside table of every creative, if creatives still read….

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