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5 Steps to Create Better Effie Case Studies

5 Steps to Create Better Effie Case Studies

Havas Global Comms

Havas Global Comms

April 10, 2018

Camp + King’s Strategy Director and Head of Communications Planning offers tips based on firsthand judging experience.

"Know your audience and recognize what’s happening in the judging room."

LBB Online

By David Morrissey
Strategy Director and Head of Communications Planning, Camp + King

April 9, 2018

 

The marketing and advertising industry is rife with award shows, but arguably none has more rigor in evaluating great work—and certainly evaluating the effectiveness of great work—than the North American Effie Awards. In first-round judging alone, every case submitted to the Effies is evaluated by no fewer than five judges for advancement consideration.

At Camp + King, we were honored to have three of our team members invited to serve as 2018 judges: Kristin Barbour, Managing Director, who judged round one in Chicago in January; David Morrissey, Strategy Director and Head of Communications Planning, who judged round one in February in San Francisco; and Jamie King, Founder and CEO, who served as a final round judge in New York. Of course, we are bound not to disclose the details of any case that we’ve reviewed. However, we wanted to share five lessons we learned as judges that you can put to use when writing your next award case submission.

1. Put yourself in the judge’s shoes when writing your case

First things first: Know your audience and recognize what’s happening in the judging room. Judges come from various senior agency and client-side roles. They’ve stepped away from the demands of their busy careers to volunteer for a half-day. They’re evaluating many cases. They’re asked to be careful and critical in assessing each case. And they’re likely feeling exposed—chances are, many of the judges reading your submission know little about your particular industry or category.

With this in mind, it’s important to focus on establishing context—help the judges understand why the business challenge you’ve set forth is particularly difficult in your category; why the results, which might appear inconsequential without category context, are actually dramatic; why the strategic insight or creative execution was breakthrough compared to traditional category work.

2. Ensure a simple, consistent narrative and voice throughout

This may sound obvious, but you’d be surprised how often written cases lack clarity, simplicity, or consistency. In one case reviewed, it was evident that the organization had multiple writers tackle each of the different sections, resulting not only in an inconsistent voice, but also in each section regurgitating the case setup, over and over again.

The best cases follow the principles of good narrative, compelling the reader to move from one section to the next and building the case as simply as possible. One helpful tactic here: Use headlines and subheads to help the judge quickly absorb the skeleton of the story.

Before submission, ensure that someone completely removed from the campaign reviews the case with fresh eyes, looking for inconsistencies and terms that mean little to category outsiders.

Read the full article here.

"Know your audience and recognize what’s happening in the judging room."

LBB Online

By David Morrissey
Strategy Director and Head of Communications Planning, Camp + King

April 9, 2018

 

The marketing and advertising industry is rife with award shows, but arguably none has more rigor in evaluating great work—and certainly evaluating the effectiveness of great work—than the North American Effie Awards. In first-round judging alone, every case submitted to the Effies is evaluated by no fewer than five judges for advancement consideration.

At Camp + King, we were honored to have three of our team members invited to serve as 2018 judges: Kristin Barbour, Managing Director, who judged round one in Chicago in January; David Morrissey, Strategy Director and Head of Communications Planning, who judged round one in February in San Francisco; and Jamie King, Founder and CEO, who served as a final round judge in New York. Of course, we are bound not to disclose the details of any case that we’ve reviewed. However, we wanted to share five lessons we learned as judges that you can put to use when writing your next award case submission.

1. Put yourself in the judge’s shoes when writing your case

First things first: Know your audience and recognize what’s happening in the judging room. Judges come from various senior agency and client-side roles. They’ve stepped away from the demands of their busy careers to volunteer for a half-day. They’re evaluating many cases. They’re asked to be careful and critical in assessing each case. And they’re likely feeling exposed—chances are, many of the judges reading your submission know little about your particular industry or category.

With this in mind, it’s important to focus on establishing context—help the judges understand why the business challenge you’ve set forth is particularly difficult in your category; why the results, which might appear inconsequential without category context, are actually dramatic; why the strategic insight or creative execution was breakthrough compared to traditional category work.

2. Ensure a simple, consistent narrative and voice throughout

This may sound obvious, but you’d be surprised how often written cases lack clarity, simplicity, or consistency. In one case reviewed, it was evident that the organization had multiple writers tackle each of the different sections, resulting not only in an inconsistent voice, but also in each section regurgitating the case setup, over and over again.

The best cases follow the principles of good narrative, compelling the reader to move from one section to the next and building the case as simply as possible. One helpful tactic here: Use headlines and subheads to help the judge quickly absorb the skeleton of the story.

Before submission, ensure that someone completely removed from the campaign reviews the case with fresh eyes, looking for inconsistencies and terms that mean little to category outsiders.

Read the full article here.

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