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The Worst Song in the World

The Worst Song in the World

Michael Carnevale

Michael Carnevale

May 29, 2018

Might be catchier than you think.

"We needed to find an insight to promote the services, something people could relate to."

Piecemealing the best of the worst from the ‘80s music scene, coupled with the burden of carrying groceries, makes for a nostalgic-esque spot that’ll keep your foot tapping. Gilles Fichteberg, Co-Founder and Chief Creative Officer of Rosapark, sits down to talk about the agency’s inspiration for “The Worst Song in the World,” what’s ahead for the team, and how they might’ve formed the next great band.

 

No one really goes into a project and says, “Hey, let’s make this the worst ____ in the world.” How do you get in that headspace and end up making something that’s so bad that it ends up being, well, good?

The brief started with the fact that people like shopping at their local Monoprix, but there’s one thing they hate—carrying their groceries. And most of them don’t use their delivery services. So we needed to find an insight to promote the services, something people could relate to.

We were thinking of what kinds of things are frustrating when you don’t have your hands free—needing to scratch your nose and that sort of thing. When you’re carrying grocery bags, that’s the kind of thing that’s impossible to do. Then the idea of not being able to skip a song came to us, which we thought was funnier. So the question was how to communicate that. The answer: a really bad song.   

While the video has a very ‘80s feel to it, the song itself runs the gamut of music clichés. What inspired some of the choices—the sax solo, and the rap and Spanish verses?

We’d listed every music faux pas in the lyrics, like vocoder, saxophone solos, music fading in and out. We went broad in our research, from Spice Girls and Gangnam Style to Scatman John and 1990s Britton rap. But ultimately, we knew we wanted to go for ‘80s music, which is admittedly one of the worst music eras of all time—the saxophone, the synths, and all of that. So we researched bad taste songs that most people hate to love—Europe, TOTO, Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark, Scorpions, a-ha, Van Halen.

Anything that didn’t make the final cut?

Initially we shot the band scenes in a big studio where we had built a barn. But when we started to edit, it seemed strange to have this ‘80s and ‘90s-style band playing in a barn, so we only included the shots where we had used a blue screen to create different backgrounds. Maybe you’ll see a few of the barn scenes in a long version of the clip.

"Though, I have to say, singing a horrible song acapella to the client was pretty rough."

What was the client’s first reaction to this idea?

The client loved the idea at the first meeting. Monoprix is a wonderful client; they always push the agency to come up with outstanding ideas with a funny twist. Though, I have to say, singing a horrible song acapella to the client was pretty rough. It was worth it, but it was quite embarrassing. Thankfully, it worked.   

How long did it take to bring this idea to life?

Overall, it took about seven months from the initial brief.  

Did you run into any hurdles?

Honestly, everything went smoothly thanks to the huge professionalism of the Traktor team. The hardest part was finding the right casting and, fortunately, we found the perfect match.

The campaign has garnered a lot of positive feedback. Were you surprised by the reaction the spot received?

Monoprix is a brand that has a very strong relationship with its audience. We are used to playing with them, and they’re always positive about it. So we were confident that they would like us to push the boundaries. However, we didn’t imagine for a second that the success would be this big.

What’s next?

We are preparing a little cherry on the cake surprise which has something to do with Google Home. Who knows what may happen when you sing “The Worst Song in the World” to the Monoprix Assistant on Google Home?

Will the song be available for download?

It is. You can find it on Spotify, Deezer, and iTunes.

Any funny moments or bloopers during the shoot?

The musicians didn’t know each other before the shoot. However, they had so much fun impersonating their characters that they wanted to start a real band after that. To be continued.

"We needed to find an insight to promote the services, something people could relate to."

Piecemealing the best of the worst from the ‘80s music scene, coupled with the burden of carrying groceries, makes for a nostalgic-esque spot that’ll keep your foot tapping. Gilles Fichteberg, Co-Founder and Chief Creative Officer of Rosapark, sits down to talk about the agency’s inspiration for “The Worst Song in the World,” what’s ahead for the team, and how they might’ve formed the next great band.

 

No one really goes into a project and says, “Hey, let’s make this the worst ____ in the world.” How do you get in that headspace and end up making something that’s so bad that it ends up being, well, good?

The brief started with the fact that people like shopping at their local Monoprix, but there’s one thing they hate—carrying their groceries. And most of them don’t use their delivery services. So we needed to find an insight to promote the services, something people could relate to.

We were thinking of what kinds of things are frustrating when you don’t have your hands free—needing to scratch your nose and that sort of thing. When you’re carrying grocery bags, that’s the kind of thing that’s impossible to do. Then the idea of not being able to skip a song came to us, which we thought was funnier. So the question was how to communicate that. The answer: a really bad song.   

While the video has a very ‘80s feel to it, the song itself runs the gamut of music clichés. What inspired some of the choices—the sax solo, and the rap and Spanish verses?

We’d listed every music faux pas in the lyrics, like vocoder, saxophone solos, music fading in and out. We went broad in our research, from Spice Girls and Gangnam Style to Scatman John and 1990s Britton rap. But ultimately, we knew we wanted to go for ‘80s music, which is admittedly one of the worst music eras of all time—the saxophone, the synths, and all of that. So we researched bad taste songs that most people hate to love—Europe, TOTO, Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark, Scorpions, a-ha, Van Halen.

Anything that didn’t make the final cut?

Initially we shot the band scenes in a big studio where we had built a barn. But when we started to edit, it seemed strange to have this ‘80s and ‘90s-style band playing in a barn, so we only included the shots where we had used a blue screen to create different backgrounds. Maybe you’ll see a few of the barn scenes in a long version of the clip.

"Though, I have to say, singing a horrible song acapella to the client was pretty rough."

What was the client’s first reaction to this idea?

The client loved the idea at the first meeting. Monoprix is a wonderful client; they always push the agency to come up with outstanding ideas with a funny twist. Though, I have to say, singing a horrible song acapella to the client was pretty rough. It was worth it, but it was quite embarrassing. Thankfully, it worked.   

How long did it take to bring this idea to life?

Overall, it took about seven months from the initial brief.  

Did you run into any hurdles?

Honestly, everything went smoothly thanks to the huge professionalism of the Traktor team. The hardest part was finding the right casting and, fortunately, we found the perfect match.

The campaign has garnered a lot of positive feedback. Were you surprised by the reaction the spot received?

Monoprix is a brand that has a very strong relationship with its audience. We are used to playing with them, and they’re always positive about it. So we were confident that they would like us to push the boundaries. However, we didn’t imagine for a second that the success would be this big.

What’s next?

We are preparing a little cherry on the cake surprise which has something to do with Google Home. Who knows what may happen when you sing “The Worst Song in the World” to the Monoprix Assistant on Google Home?

Will the song be available for download?

It is. You can find it on Spotify, Deezer, and iTunes.

Any funny moments or bloopers during the shoot?

The musicians didn’t know each other before the shoot. However, they had so much fun impersonating their characters that they wanted to start a real band after that. To be continued.

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