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The Real You Matters

The Real You Matters

Michael Carnevale

Michael Carnevale

July 9, 2018

No one should have to hide who they are—especially at work.

"Creating an inclusive workplace allows people to bring their whole selves to work in order to achieve their best."

Damian Royce, Executive Creative Director at Havas Melbourne, dissects his team’s latest campaign for Australian broadcasting network SBS. The campaign focuses on inclusion in the workplace—and aims to create a happier and more productive environment for everyone.

 

What is the difference between diversity and inclusion?

That is a very good question. In fact, confusion surrounding the difference between the two is one of the reasons why this campaign was created. In the context of the workplace, diversity, as the name suggests, is an environment made up of people with different backgrounds, cultures, genders, experiences, and skills. Inclusion, on the other hand, is where different beliefs and ways of working, and the points of view of diverse people, are embraced in order to create better outcomes for both the organization and its people.

How important is it that people are able to be their authentic selves at work?

Very important. Creating an inclusive workplace allows people to bring their whole selves to work in order to achieve their best. This results in a happier, more productive environment and it also improves mental health. To put that into context, a recent study by the Diversity Council of Australia found employees in inclusive workplaces are 19 times more likely to be satisfied with their job and four times more likely to stay with their employer. However, in the last 12 months, one in five Australians have experienced discrimination in the workplace and felt the need to cover up aspects of who they are in front of their coworkers and managers.

Why might this not be happening in some workplaces?

Some organizations have taken steps to make sure there is enough diversity within the workplace, including gender balance, but they haven’t changed the way they operate in order for diverse people to thrive together.

Why did major Australian broadcaster SBS decide to tackle this workplace issue in this recent campaign?

The core purpose of SBS is to provide multilingual and multicultural television and digital media services that inform, educate and entertain all Australians and, in doing so, reflect Australia’s multicultural society. Communicating their views on inclusion and implementing strategies to help foster an inclusive workplace is very important to them.

What’s the storyline of this spot, The Real You Matters?

The Real You Matters tackles the subject of inclusion by featuring people who feel the need to hide an essential part of who they are out of fear of being excluded, judged or discriminated against. The film dramatizes this fear-driven behavior via three employees and their desperate attempts to hide a part of themselves from work colleagues and managers. A man puts his flexibility to the test to disguise his Muslim faith, a woman defies physics to conceal her pregnancy and a gay woman goes to extreme measures to cover up the gender of her fiancée.

How’d your team come up with this idea?

We all felt it was absurd that people should fear being discriminated against in the workplace because of their beliefs, looks or sexual orientation. This discussion led us to think that an idea featuring people hiding their true selves in absurd ways could be an effective way to dramatize the topic and get people thinking.

What type of research did your team have to conduct in order to find the right storylines?

Being an inherently diverse organization, Special Broadcasting Service (SBS) implemented their own internal research, which consisted of surveys and focus groups. They also commissioned an external research company.

Was there ever any hesitation about tackling the topic of inclusion?

No. That fact that there has been so much conversation around diversity, but in contrast relatively little discussion given to the more complex notion of inclusiveness, made us realize that this was a great opportunity to help SBS highlight the important topic of inclusion.

What impact do SBS and Havas Melbourne hope this campaign will have on viewers?

We hope the message we created for SBS makes people realize that inclusion is at the core of building a happier and more productive environment, where both organizations and individuals can thrive and achieve their best.

"Creating an inclusive workplace allows people to bring their whole selves to work in order to achieve their best."

Damian Royce, Executive Creative Director at Havas Melbourne, dissects his team’s latest campaign for Australian broadcasting network SBS. The campaign focuses on inclusion in the workplace—and aims to create a happier and more productive environment for everyone.

 

What is the difference between diversity and inclusion?

That is a very good question. In fact, confusion surrounding the difference between the two is one of the reasons why this campaign was created. In the context of the workplace, diversity, as the name suggests, is an environment made up of people with different backgrounds, cultures, genders, experiences, and skills. Inclusion, on the other hand, is where different beliefs and ways of working, and the points of view of diverse people, are embraced in order to create better outcomes for both the organization and its people.

How important is it that people are able to be their authentic selves at work?

Very important. Creating an inclusive workplace allows people to bring their whole selves to work in order to achieve their best. This results in a happier, more productive environment and it also improves mental health. To put that into context, a recent study by the Diversity Council of Australia found employees in inclusive workplaces are 19 times more likely to be satisfied with their job and four times more likely to stay with their employer. However, in the last 12 months, one in five Australians have experienced discrimination in the workplace and felt the need to cover up aspects of who they are in front of their coworkers and managers.

Why might this not be happening in some workplaces?

Some organizations have taken steps to make sure there is enough diversity within the workplace, including gender balance, but they haven’t changed the way they operate in order for diverse people to thrive together.

Why did major Australian broadcaster SBS decide to tackle this workplace issue in this recent campaign?

The core purpose of SBS is to provide multilingual and multicultural television and digital media services that inform, educate and entertain all Australians and, in doing so, reflect Australia’s multicultural society. Communicating their views on inclusion and implementing strategies to help foster an inclusive workplace is very important to them.

What’s the storyline of this spot, The Real You Matters?

The Real You Matters tackles the subject of inclusion by featuring people who feel the need to hide an essential part of who they are out of fear of being excluded, judged or discriminated against. The film dramatizes this fear-driven behavior via three employees and their desperate attempts to hide a part of themselves from work colleagues and managers. A man puts his flexibility to the test to disguise his Muslim faith, a woman defies physics to conceal her pregnancy and a gay woman goes to extreme measures to cover up the gender of her fiancée.

How’d your team come up with this idea?

We all felt it was absurd that people should fear being discriminated against in the workplace because of their beliefs, looks or sexual orientation. This discussion led us to think that an idea featuring people hiding their true selves in absurd ways could be an effective way to dramatize the topic and get people thinking.

What type of research did your team have to conduct in order to find the right storylines?

Being an inherently diverse organization, Special Broadcasting Service (SBS) implemented their own internal research, which consisted of surveys and focus groups. They also commissioned an external research company.

Was there ever any hesitation about tackling the topic of inclusion?

No. That fact that there has been so much conversation around diversity, but in contrast relatively little discussion given to the more complex notion of inclusiveness, made us realize that this was a great opportunity to help SBS highlight the important topic of inclusion.

What impact do SBS and Havas Melbourne hope this campaign will have on viewers?

We hope the message we created for SBS makes people realize that inclusion is at the core of building a happier and more productive environment, where both organizations and individuals can thrive and achieve their best.

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