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The Pleasure Is Mine

The Pleasure Is Mine

Danielle Smith

Danielle Smith

June 25, 2019

The #GetWhatYouWant Docuseries for KY

"The idea for the documentary came out of the desire to facilitate a conversation for women and lead by example instead of just talking at them."

Kim Baskinger and Pam Kim, two Executive Creative Directors for Havas New York Creative, were tasked with rebranding KY, the longest standing lube brand they called, “the Kleenex of lube.” The result was a three-part docuseries that started a sex-positive conversation focused on undoing shame and empowering women to #GetWhatYouWant. “I personally think the farther you get into it, the more impactful it gets because it gets emotional,” said Kim. 

 

What was the client’s brief? What was the goal for the client?

Baskinger: Well, sales were in decline and they weren’t known for anything — they were basically the Kleenex of lube. There’s a lot of smaller brands that speak more directly to women and more frankly about sex. So for them, what they wanted to do was become the purveyors of this sex positive conversation. They have 100 years standing in the category, they were the first brand that was doing this and it’s the longest that stuck around and they felt like they wanted to create a space for women to talk about sex.

Kim: KY is well known. They don’t have a problem with recognition. They just weren’t relevant or sexy and they wanted to change that.

Baskinger: So they wanted to start this sex positive conversation. But in order to do that we felt like it was really important to figure out why people weren’t talking about sex in the first place, and why American women in particular feel a certain way about sex. So the idea for the documentary came out of the desire to facilitate a conversation for women and lead by example instead of just talking at them. 

Kim: They wanted to normalize the conversation about sex. People think of lube as kinky or something that indicates that you have a problem. It has a lot of stigmas around it. Delving into that we realized people don’t even talk about sex in general. So it was kind of the brand taking that step in not telling people to normalize it, but realizing we just have to do it. 

 

What were some of the core insights that informed the campaign?

Baskinger: Some of the stats that we were playing with were 69% of women put their partners pleasure before their own. So they’re never taught that pleasure is a part of sex. They’re taught that it’s something that they have to endure or just sort of go along with. That was a huge eye opener. Very few people have the tools to even go about having a conversation with their partners to change that dynamic so that played a huge part in regards to us having a certified sex therapists talk people though this and tease things out so they can let go. 

 

Tell us a little about how this project came together. Why a docuseries and why did you decide to break the docuseries into three parts?

Baskinger: Once we started thinking about how we were going to dimensionalize the conversation of sex for women we realized that there are a lot of pieces and they started to blend together. It is a very complex system so originally we thought about doing a documentary, but then we thought wait I think if we break this out into smaller bite size content pieces you’re able to kind of focus and deep dive into different issues.

 

Kim: There were so many topics to cover and so many different women we wanted to include. Originally when we were tasked with doing a 30-second spot there was no way we could get everything we wanted to say into that time frame. We didn’t want that longer piece to be just telling people what to do, we wanted to hear from people and normalize it by having a conversation. 

 

How did you decide who to include in the docuseries and what voices to highlight in post editing?

Baskinger: That’s a good question because yes, it was important to us that we had a diverse group of women in regards to sex, race, location (in regards to upbringing), and even sexuality. It was important because we all have the same thing in common, which is this layer of shame or hesitation around sex, right. So it was important to cast the net very wide to prove a point that we all have this in common. 

 

Kim: Women, in particular, go through so many different sexual stages whether it be pregnancy or post pregnancy or how your body changes so we wanted to make sure we were thinking about all of those stages.

 

Baskinger: The brand caters to a very diverse range of people, so we knew we needed range in age and kind of life experience, but really the more diverse that we were able to make it the more it hammered home the point that we all have this in common. 

 

Kim: It was an incredibly diverse group of women, but you see in the film when they talk they all express the same underlying issues. 

"We have the opportunity to illicit some cultural or social change through our medium, and not just to stop at what is asked of the brand, but to think bigger and think about what might matter to people."

Any interesting moments while making this campaign?

Baskinger: It was powerful just watching this women open up about such an intimate topic. There are 30 of us on one side of a camera, and they’re off in another room sharing their story with the world. 

 

Kim: There were certain moments, in spite of the business, when things were pin drop quiet because things got emotional and feeling what they were feeling you’d cross the line of “job” and it got personal. 

 

What was your personal experience saying things like “dry vagina” in a mixed gender meeting with your colleagues, clients, and superiors?

Kim: I think it started out a little weird and then I got so used to it that now I could say it in front of anyone. 

 

Baskinger: The team is also 95% women. 

 

What do you hope people take away from this campaign?

Baskinger: I just hope for them it helps them shed a little bit of that shame that we all carry. How much it affects you in your day to day life varies, but if it helps you walk away thinking a little bit lighter, or a little bit differently about having these tougher conversations then I think we’ve done a good job.

 

Kim: Hopefully the next generation can open up a bit and things can start to change…it would be nice to have a little bit of that breakthrough so my kids won’t feel so shameful or weird talking about these things. 

 

What has been the response from client and audience to this campaign?

Baskinger: The client is really ecstatic because its been hard for them to do anything outside of a standard 15-second spot or digital campaign. So I think they saw the value in it and are really excited because they have people engaging with them in a new way. By leading by example, it’s kind of given them a new voice. 

 

Kim: Everyone that’s seen it has had an overwhelmingly positive response to it. I just think we need more eyeballs on it. 

 

How do you hope to inspire others with this work and beyond?

Kim: Within Havas on the creative team I’m hoping to inspire people to go beyond the typical spots.

 

Baskinger: I hope we inspire people to think bigger about the roles that these brands play in the world. We have the opportunity to illicit some cultural or social change through our medium, and not just to stop at what is asked of the brand, but to think bigger and think about what might matter to people.

"The idea for the documentary came out of the desire to facilitate a conversation for women and lead by example instead of just talking at them."

Kim Baskinger and Pam Kim, two Executive Creative Directors for Havas New York Creative, were tasked with rebranding KY, the longest standing lube brand they called, “the Kleenex of lube.” The result was a three-part docuseries that started a sex-positive conversation focused on undoing shame and empowering women to #GetWhatYouWant. “I personally think the farther you get into it, the more impactful it gets because it gets emotional,” said Kim. 

 

What was the client’s brief? What was the goal for the client?

Baskinger: Well, sales were in decline and they weren’t known for anything — they were basically the Kleenex of lube. There’s a lot of smaller brands that speak more directly to women and more frankly about sex. So for them, what they wanted to do was become the purveyors of this sex positive conversation. They have 100 years standing in the category, they were the first brand that was doing this and it’s the longest that stuck around and they felt like they wanted to create a space for women to talk about sex.

Kim: KY is well known. They don’t have a problem with recognition. They just weren’t relevant or sexy and they wanted to change that.

Baskinger: So they wanted to start this sex positive conversation. But in order to do that we felt like it was really important to figure out why people weren’t talking about sex in the first place, and why American women in particular feel a certain way about sex. So the idea for the documentary came out of the desire to facilitate a conversation for women and lead by example instead of just talking at them. 

Kim: They wanted to normalize the conversation about sex. People think of lube as kinky or something that indicates that you have a problem. It has a lot of stigmas around it. Delving into that we realized people don’t even talk about sex in general. So it was kind of the brand taking that step in not telling people to normalize it, but realizing we just have to do it. 

 

What were some of the core insights that informed the campaign?

Baskinger: Some of the stats that we were playing with were 69% of women put their partners pleasure before their own. So they’re never taught that pleasure is a part of sex. They’re taught that it’s something that they have to endure or just sort of go along with. That was a huge eye opener. Very few people have the tools to even go about having a conversation with their partners to change that dynamic so that played a huge part in regards to us having a certified sex therapists talk people though this and tease things out so they can let go. 

 

Tell us a little about how this project came together. Why a docuseries and why did you decide to break the docuseries into three parts?

Baskinger: Once we started thinking about how we were going to dimensionalize the conversation of sex for women we realized that there are a lot of pieces and they started to blend together. It is a very complex system so originally we thought about doing a documentary, but then we thought wait I think if we break this out into smaller bite size content pieces you’re able to kind of focus and deep dive into different issues.

 

Kim: There were so many topics to cover and so many different women we wanted to include. Originally when we were tasked with doing a 30-second spot there was no way we could get everything we wanted to say into that time frame. We didn’t want that longer piece to be just telling people what to do, we wanted to hear from people and normalize it by having a conversation. 

 

How did you decide who to include in the docuseries and what voices to highlight in post editing?

Baskinger: That’s a good question because yes, it was important to us that we had a diverse group of women in regards to sex, race, location (in regards to upbringing), and even sexuality. It was important because we all have the same thing in common, which is this layer of shame or hesitation around sex, right. So it was important to cast the net very wide to prove a point that we all have this in common. 

 

Kim: Women, in particular, go through so many different sexual stages whether it be pregnancy or post pregnancy or how your body changes so we wanted to make sure we were thinking about all of those stages.

 

Baskinger: The brand caters to a very diverse range of people, so we knew we needed range in age and kind of life experience, but really the more diverse that we were able to make it the more it hammered home the point that we all have this in common. 

 

Kim: It was an incredibly diverse group of women, but you see in the film when they talk they all express the same underlying issues. 

"We have the opportunity to illicit some cultural or social change through our medium, and not just to stop at what is asked of the brand, but to think bigger and think about what might matter to people."

Any interesting moments while making this campaign?

Baskinger: It was powerful just watching this women open up about such an intimate topic. There are 30 of us on one side of a camera, and they’re off in another room sharing their story with the world. 

 

Kim: There were certain moments, in spite of the business, when things were pin drop quiet because things got emotional and feeling what they were feeling you’d cross the line of “job” and it got personal. 

 

What was your personal experience saying things like “dry vagina” in a mixed gender meeting with your colleagues, clients, and superiors?

Kim: I think it started out a little weird and then I got so used to it that now I could say it in front of anyone. 

 

Baskinger: The team is also 95% women. 

 

What do you hope people take away from this campaign?

Baskinger: I just hope for them it helps them shed a little bit of that shame that we all carry. How much it affects you in your day to day life varies, but if it helps you walk away thinking a little bit lighter, or a little bit differently about having these tougher conversations then I think we’ve done a good job.

 

Kim: Hopefully the next generation can open up a bit and things can start to change…it would be nice to have a little bit of that breakthrough so my kids won’t feel so shameful or weird talking about these things. 

 

What has been the response from client and audience to this campaign?

Baskinger: The client is really ecstatic because its been hard for them to do anything outside of a standard 15-second spot or digital campaign. So I think they saw the value in it and are really excited because they have people engaging with them in a new way. By leading by example, it’s kind of given them a new voice. 

 

Kim: Everyone that’s seen it has had an overwhelmingly positive response to it. I just think we need more eyeballs on it. 

 

How do you hope to inspire others with this work and beyond?

Kim: Within Havas on the creative team I’m hoping to inspire people to go beyond the typical spots.

 

Baskinger: I hope we inspire people to think bigger about the roles that these brands play in the world. We have the opportunity to illicit some cultural or social change through our medium, and not just to stop at what is asked of the brand, but to think bigger and think about what might matter to people.

Danielle Smith is the Communications Manager of Havas Group. She’s believes every meal can be tacos if you have tortillas and the heart to try.

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