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Taking Aim at Gun Violence

Taking Aim at Gun Violence

Sulaiman Beg

Sulaiman Beg

August 26, 2019

Arnold Worldwide eerily illustrates the unique and preventable dangers of printing 3D guns.

"3D gun files can be easily downloaded and printed by anyone, creating untraceable firearms. In most states, this is completely legal."

In a time where there have been 255 mass shootings in the US in 2019 and 3D printing technology is becoming cheaper and better, Arnold Worldwide and Stop Handgun Violence are looking to push lawmakers to ban its use when it comes to firearms.

A harrowing campaign for Stop Handgun Violence (SHV), the lead advocate for gun violence prevention in Massachusetts—the state with the lowest gun death rate and the most effective gun prevention laws in the country—depicts chilling still images of students as 3D prints as they look to block a door and climb through windows in order to escape from an active shooter. 

The PSA concludes by informing viewers that 100,000 Americans downloaded plans to 3D-print weapons last year and calls on viewers to help ban 3D-printed guns, directing them to Ban3dPrintedGuns.com

Last month, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed a bill that would ban the manufacture and sale of 3D-printed guns in the state.

Arnold Creative Directors Lucas De Oliveira and Gui Rácz share how the haunting campaign came to be.

 

What was the brief from Stop Handgun Violence?

The brief was very simple: engage people and make it easier for them to contact their congressmen and women to encourage them to act against the proliferation of 3D printed guns. 

What insight(s) drove the campaign?

3D gun files can be easily downloaded and printed by anyone, creating untraceable firearms. In most states, this is completely legal. 

Stop Handgun Violence is working hard to ban 3D printed firearms by sending users to a microsite where users can contact their congressmen or congresswomen to drive forward national legislative action. At the website, people can watch a video that dramatizes the danger of having people downloading blueprints of guns in their own living room without having background checks. “3D Tragedies” was a project created in partnership with production companies specialized in 3D and music.

Why focus on 3D guns?

With 3D printers, getting a gun could be as easy as downloading it. A person could find a schematic for a firearm online, plug it into a 3D printer with the right materials, and that’s it—a gun is created on the spot. No background check required, no serial number to trace the gun if it’s used in a crime. The fact that anyone with access to a 3D printer could potentially create a gun is alarming—especially as gun violence is already so high in the U.S. with mass shootings happening at least once a month.

It seems that every week you hear about a new tragedy that involves gun violence. With 3D printing technologies rapidly improving and 3D gun files readily available, it’s only a matter of time before someone commits an unimaginable act with a weapon they printed at home. This campaign was created to warn people who may not be aware that this is a very real problem that we need to deal with it before it’s too late.

"We were using our talent to give back to the community. The more agencies working to solve community problems the better."

The song choice helps set the haunting mood of the spot, how did you come to pick it? 

It’s an original song, composed specifically for this work. The composers understood the ask and worked nonstop until they could create this sort of melancholic atmosphere that captures your attention and makes you hold tight to your seat. The song carries the weight and anguish we all feel when we hear and watch news of violent acts happening due to gun violence—and especially school shootings—across America.

Obviously, working on a topic like this can’t be easy, how did the team keep their mood up? 

It was rewarding to know we were doing the right thing. We were using our talent to give back to the community. The more agencies working to solve community problems the better.

What was your experience like working with production and design studio Lobo and directors Mateus de Paula Santos and Aron Matschulat Aguiar?

The biggest challenge was to find the right tone, visual, mood, and narrative. The proposed scenario is extremely sensitive and dramatic. We needed to spend the time to craft each piece of the scene so they could all work together to reveal a compelling story that would draw the viewer in and hopefully encourage them to act against the proliferation of 3D printed weapons. 

What do you hope people take away from this campaign?

We take one step at a time. First, the best of the worlds would draw as many viewers as possible and encourage them to act against the proliferation of 3D printed weapons. Then, once 3D printed guns are banned, we would move onto the next problem, a bigger problem, which is to engage people to take action on gun control.

"3D gun files can be easily downloaded and printed by anyone, creating untraceable firearms. In most states, this is completely legal."

In a time where there have been 255 mass shootings in the US in 2019 and 3D printing technology is becoming cheaper and better, Arnold Worldwide and Stop Handgun Violence are looking to push lawmakers to ban its use when it comes to firearms.

A harrowing campaign for Stop Handgun Violence (SHV), the lead advocate for gun violence prevention in Massachusetts—the state with the lowest gun death rate and the most effective gun prevention laws in the country—depicts chilling still images of students as 3D prints as they look to block a door and climb through windows in order to escape from an active shooter. 

The PSA concludes by informing viewers that 100,000 Americans downloaded plans to 3D-print weapons last year and calls on viewers to help ban 3D-printed guns, directing them to Ban3dPrintedGuns.com

Last month, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed a bill that would ban the manufacture and sale of 3D-printed guns in the state.

Arnold Creative Directors Lucas De Oliveira and Gui Rácz share how the haunting campaign came to be.

 

What was the brief from Stop Handgun Violence?

The brief was very simple: engage people and make it easier for them to contact their congressmen and women to encourage them to act against the proliferation of 3D printed guns. 

What insight(s) drove the campaign?

3D gun files can be easily downloaded and printed by anyone, creating untraceable firearms. In most states, this is completely legal. 

Stop Handgun Violence is working hard to ban 3D printed firearms by sending users to a microsite where users can contact their congressmen or congresswomen to drive forward national legislative action. At the website, people can watch a video that dramatizes the danger of having people downloading blueprints of guns in their own living room without having background checks. “3D Tragedies” was a project created in partnership with production companies specialized in 3D and music.

Why focus on 3D guns?

With 3D printers, getting a gun could be as easy as downloading it. A person could find a schematic for a firearm online, plug it into a 3D printer with the right materials, and that’s it—a gun is created on the spot. No background check required, no serial number to trace the gun if it’s used in a crime. The fact that anyone with access to a 3D printer could potentially create a gun is alarming—especially as gun violence is already so high in the U.S. with mass shootings happening at least once a month.

It seems that every week you hear about a new tragedy that involves gun violence. With 3D printing technologies rapidly improving and 3D gun files readily available, it’s only a matter of time before someone commits an unimaginable act with a weapon they printed at home. This campaign was created to warn people who may not be aware that this is a very real problem that we need to deal with it before it’s too late.

"We were using our talent to give back to the community. The more agencies working to solve community problems the better."

The song choice helps set the haunting mood of the spot, how did you come to pick it? 

It’s an original song, composed specifically for this work. The composers understood the ask and worked nonstop until they could create this sort of melancholic atmosphere that captures your attention and makes you hold tight to your seat. The song carries the weight and anguish we all feel when we hear and watch news of violent acts happening due to gun violence—and especially school shootings—across America.

Obviously, working on a topic like this can’t be easy, how did the team keep their mood up? 

It was rewarding to know we were doing the right thing. We were using our talent to give back to the community. The more agencies working to solve community problems the better.

What was your experience like working with production and design studio Lobo and directors Mateus de Paula Santos and Aron Matschulat Aguiar?

The biggest challenge was to find the right tone, visual, mood, and narrative. The proposed scenario is extremely sensitive and dramatic. We needed to spend the time to craft each piece of the scene so they could all work together to reveal a compelling story that would draw the viewer in and hopefully encourage them to act against the proliferation of 3D printed weapons. 

What do you hope people take away from this campaign?

We take one step at a time. First, the best of the worlds would draw as many viewers as possible and encourage them to act against the proliferation of 3D printed weapons. Then, once 3D printed guns are banned, we would move onto the next problem, a bigger problem, which is to engage people to take action on gun control.

Sulaiman Beg is Havas' Director of Global Internal Communications. He has never eaten canned tuna fish.

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