havas Content printed form Havas - The Download - https://download.havas.com/behind-the-work/scoring-big/
Work

Scoring Big

Scoring Big

Natasha Smith

Natasha Smith

February 25, 2019

Athletes in Costa Rica with challenges get the opportunity of a lifetime.

"We launched the “My Spare Boot” Campaign, an initiative to make the Costa Rica Amputee Soccer Team’s participation possible in their first Amputee World Cup by selling their spare boots."

Javier Urbaneja, CCO at Havas Tribu, shares how the Asociación Deportiva de Fútbol Amputados, a sports association for amputee soccer players, and his creative team helped 13 amputee soccer players achieve their dreams of playing in the Amputee World Cup.

 

Tell us about the Amputee World Cup in Mexico.

This year the Amputee World Cup arrived in Guadalajara, Mexico. Twenty-two countries competed to win the cup. It was the first time in the history of Costa Rica that its National Amputee Soccer Team qualified for this competition.

What challenges, financial or otherwise, did this 13-player team face to be able to travel and play in the games?

Unfortunately, Paralympic sports are not supported by the government, so the team didn’t have the economic resources necessary to compete. They needed to collect $20,000 to make their participation possible in the Amputee World Cup.

So, describe this campaign.

Our main objective was to collect $20,000 to make participation possible for the Costa Rica National Amputee Soccer Team in the Amputee World Cup in Mexico. One way to raise funds was to sell things that players had left over. We launched the “My Spare Boot” Campaign, an initiative to make the Costa Rica Amputee Soccer Team’s participation possible in their first Amputee World Cup by selling their spare boots. So, we collected 13 spare boots (one from each of the 13 players on the national team) and put them on sale as collector’s items—each spare boot selling for $1,500.

"We loved their authenticity and goodwill—they took on the project with humor and humility."

Tell us about the promotional mix: the videos, the catalogs, the boot replica.

Each player sold their own spare boot through a video campaign on Facebook. Also, a catalog was sent to possible buyers (commercial brands). Each spare boot was placed in a collection box with the story of the player who owned it and was delivered to its buyer. News outlets and sports media covered the campaign, and several invited the National Amputee Soccer Team to talk with them about the “My Spare Boot” initiative.

The strategy was to create sponsorship from those spare boots. And who were the best ones to offer those sponsorships? Brands, of course. The strategy had two phases: the first phase consisted of generating awareness that the National Amputee Soccer Team was not attending the Amputee World Cup due to lack of economic resources; the second phase was approaching the companies directly and selling them the spare boots. It was the right strategy because once we gained media and public attention, our potential buyers (ie, brands) wanted to be the heroes of the story and get us to accomplish our goal of helping these athletes attend the Amputee World Cup. We gave them a weapon for being relevant in media.

Tell us about the stories featured in the videos, and which was your favorite?

Behind every boot, there was a player that had something to tell…or “sell.” We loved their authenticity and goodwill—they took on the project with humor and humility. They knew the idea had the risk of going unnoticed, so they put their hearts into every video, selling their boots which were as good as new.  We can’t choose one specifically as our favorite—all of them conveyed something very personal about the players.

How did this campaign appeal to the hearts of people?

It was a very warm campaign. It was easy for everyone to identify with the players and the cause. It also had a component of humor which made it even easier to connect with the message. This is what caught the attention of the media, and it’s what prompted so many brands to contribute to the cause. It was also the first time for Costa Rica to have its National Amputee Soccer Team playing at a World Cup, so the feelings of nationalism and the love for the sport were also very strong.

Results?

After three weeks of campaigning, all 13 boots were sold. We collected more than $22,000 in donations. Left more than 5 million impressions. And iconic professional soccer players joined the campaign, selling their own boots and donating the money to the amputee team. We made the team’s participation possible with zero budget.

"We launched the “My Spare Boot” Campaign, an initiative to make the Costa Rica Amputee Soccer Team’s participation possible in their first Amputee World Cup by selling their spare boots."

Javier Urbaneja, CCO at Havas Tribu, shares how the Asociación Deportiva de Fútbol Amputados, a sports association for amputee soccer players, and his creative team helped 13 amputee soccer players achieve their dreams of playing in the Amputee World Cup.

 

Tell us about the Amputee World Cup in Mexico.

This year the Amputee World Cup arrived in Guadalajara, Mexico. Twenty-two countries competed to win the cup. It was the first time in the history of Costa Rica that its National Amputee Soccer Team qualified for this competition.

What challenges, financial or otherwise, did this 13-player team face to be able to travel and play in the games?

Unfortunately, Paralympic sports are not supported by the government, so the team didn’t have the economic resources necessary to compete. They needed to collect $20,000 to make their participation possible in the Amputee World Cup.

So, describe this campaign.

Our main objective was to collect $20,000 to make participation possible for the Costa Rica National Amputee Soccer Team in the Amputee World Cup in Mexico. One way to raise funds was to sell things that players had left over. We launched the “My Spare Boot” Campaign, an initiative to make the Costa Rica Amputee Soccer Team’s participation possible in their first Amputee World Cup by selling their spare boots. So, we collected 13 spare boots (one from each of the 13 players on the national team) and put them on sale as collector’s items—each spare boot selling for $1,500.

"We loved their authenticity and goodwill—they took on the project with humor and humility."

Tell us about the promotional mix: the videos, the catalogs, the boot replica.

Each player sold their own spare boot through a video campaign on Facebook. Also, a catalog was sent to possible buyers (commercial brands). Each spare boot was placed in a collection box with the story of the player who owned it and was delivered to its buyer. News outlets and sports media covered the campaign, and several invited the National Amputee Soccer Team to talk with them about the “My Spare Boot” initiative.

The strategy was to create sponsorship from those spare boots. And who were the best ones to offer those sponsorships? Brands, of course. The strategy had two phases: the first phase consisted of generating awareness that the National Amputee Soccer Team was not attending the Amputee World Cup due to lack of economic resources; the second phase was approaching the companies directly and selling them the spare boots. It was the right strategy because once we gained media and public attention, our potential buyers (ie, brands) wanted to be the heroes of the story and get us to accomplish our goal of helping these athletes attend the Amputee World Cup. We gave them a weapon for being relevant in media.

Tell us about the stories featured in the videos, and which was your favorite?

Behind every boot, there was a player that had something to tell…or “sell.” We loved their authenticity and goodwill—they took on the project with humor and humility. They knew the idea had the risk of going unnoticed, so they put their hearts into every video, selling their boots which were as good as new.  We can’t choose one specifically as our favorite—all of them conveyed something very personal about the players.

How did this campaign appeal to the hearts of people?

It was a very warm campaign. It was easy for everyone to identify with the players and the cause. It also had a component of humor which made it even easier to connect with the message. This is what caught the attention of the media, and it’s what prompted so many brands to contribute to the cause. It was also the first time for Costa Rica to have its National Amputee Soccer Team playing at a World Cup, so the feelings of nationalism and the love for the sport were also very strong.

Results?

After three weeks of campaigning, all 13 boots were sold. We collected more than $22,000 in donations. Left more than 5 million impressions. And iconic professional soccer players joined the campaign, selling their own boots and donating the money to the amputee team. We made the team’s participation possible with zero budget.

Natasha Smith is the strategic communications manager for Havas Group. She happily represents 404 in the 212.

contact our office

Call:

Stop by:

Connect: