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Inclusion: It’s Everyone’s Job

Inclusion: It’s Everyone’s Job

Danielle Smith

Danielle Smith

April 29, 2019

HOY by Havas creates the first LinkedIn profiles for adults with Down Syndrome in Argentina.

"In Argentina, less than 10% of people with Down Syndrome who are of working age have a job."

HOY by Havas’ Executive Creative Directors Nicolás Zarlenga and Federico Plaza Montero share how they took an idea for more inclusive representation of adults with Down Syndrome in the professional world and turned it into a winning pitch to LinkedIn and a partnership with the Asociacion Sindrome de Down de la Republica Argentina (ASDRA).

 

What was the client’s brief?

There was no brief. Two of our creative directors came up with the idea and we presented it to LinkedIn. First, we had to work with our research team to confirm that there were no profiles of people with Down Syndrome on LinkedIn Argentina. Then, at our regular Friday meeting where creatives and others at the agency collaborate on proactive ideas, this idea was presented.

What was the insight that led to this campaign?

In Argentina, less than 10% of people with Down Syndrome who are of working age have a job. However, the majority of them are willing to work and are active in the search. The problem is that there is very little information within companies and society about this issue,  and finding these adults is difficult. We wanted to give them more visibility and contribute to making a change.

Tell us a little about how this project came together?

It is a practice at our agency to dedicate about two hours every Friday where we invite creatives and anyone on the team to come together and present proactive ideas. This idea was one of them that stuck with us. Once we confirmed with Internet Media Services (LinkedIn representatives in Argentina) that the insight was true we developed the idea for the full campaign, went to LinkedIn and pitched. Next, we decided to partner with the ASDRA (Asociacion Sindrome de Down de la Republica Argentina) because we needed them to do this in a proper way. They helped us with organizing the training workshops and worked with us to create the best profiles for the activation.

"Our agency likes to be close to issues happening in society."

It’s odd to think that some people right now are at a job they hate, while there are other people hungry to get through the door. Was that a theme for the creative?

Our team is always considering how to be more inclusive with the work we do. Our agency likes to be close to issues happening in society, which includes unemployment. The video mentions a line about this: how jobs should be available to those who aren’t making excuses to get out and do the work.

In addition to the videos, was there any training provided so that the adults could enhance and further their career search?

Yes. We developed a training program that we gave here, at the HOY offices in Buenos Aires. Professionals from ASDRA and LinkedIn coached the prospective employees with Down Syndrome on how to create their profiles. We have already held to two classes and in May we will have a third to teach specifically how to  interact with the platform daily.

What do you hope people take away from the campaign?

We hope more people with Down Syndrome get a job. It was great to get the news that during the first week of the campaign one of the profiles earned that person an interview with a big multinational company.

Have you stayed in touch with the individuals; are any of them employed now?

We know that at least three of them are working and, yes, we are grateful to start a very nice relationship with some of them and also with ASDRA.

Any further plans for the campaign?

The plan is to partner with companies interested in hiring people with Down Syndrome to provide training and give them a better understanding of the value these hires can add to their teams.

"In Argentina, less than 10% of people with Down Syndrome who are of working age have a job."

HOY by Havas’ Executive Creative Directors Nicolás Zarlenga and Federico Plaza Montero share how they took an idea for more inclusive representation of adults with Down Syndrome in the professional world and turned it into a winning pitch to LinkedIn and a partnership with the Asociacion Sindrome de Down de la Republica Argentina (ASDRA).

 

What was the client’s brief?

There was no brief. Two of our creative directors came up with the idea and we presented it to LinkedIn. First, we had to work with our research team to confirm that there were no profiles of people with Down Syndrome on LinkedIn Argentina. Then, at our regular Friday meeting where creatives and others at the agency collaborate on proactive ideas, this idea was presented.

What was the insight that led to this campaign?

In Argentina, less than 10% of people with Down Syndrome who are of working age have a job. However, the majority of them are willing to work and are active in the search. The problem is that there is very little information within companies and society about this issue,  and finding these adults is difficult. We wanted to give them more visibility and contribute to making a change.

Tell us a little about how this project came together?

It is a practice at our agency to dedicate about two hours every Friday where we invite creatives and anyone on the team to come together and present proactive ideas. This idea was one of them that stuck with us. Once we confirmed with Internet Media Services (LinkedIn representatives in Argentina) that the insight was true we developed the idea for the full campaign, went to LinkedIn and pitched. Next, we decided to partner with the ASDRA (Asociacion Sindrome de Down de la Republica Argentina) because we needed them to do this in a proper way. They helped us with organizing the training workshops and worked with us to create the best profiles for the activation.

"Our agency likes to be close to issues happening in society."

It’s odd to think that some people right now are at a job they hate, while there are other people hungry to get through the door. Was that a theme for the creative?

Our team is always considering how to be more inclusive with the work we do. Our agency likes to be close to issues happening in society, which includes unemployment. The video mentions a line about this: how jobs should be available to those who aren’t making excuses to get out and do the work.

In addition to the videos, was there any training provided so that the adults could enhance and further their career search?

Yes. We developed a training program that we gave here, at the HOY offices in Buenos Aires. Professionals from ASDRA and LinkedIn coached the prospective employees with Down Syndrome on how to create their profiles. We have already held to two classes and in May we will have a third to teach specifically how to  interact with the platform daily.

What do you hope people take away from the campaign?

We hope more people with Down Syndrome get a job. It was great to get the news that during the first week of the campaign one of the profiles earned that person an interview with a big multinational company.

Have you stayed in touch with the individuals; are any of them employed now?

We know that at least three of them are working and, yes, we are grateful to start a very nice relationship with some of them and also with ASDRA.

Any further plans for the campaign?

The plan is to partner with companies interested in hiring people with Down Syndrome to provide training and give them a better understanding of the value these hires can add to their teams.

Danielle Smith is the Communications Manager of Havas Group. She’s believes every meal can be tacos if you have tortillas and the heart to try.

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