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Bridging the Gender Pay Gap

Bridging the Gender Pay Gap

Natasha Smith

Natasha Smith

August 15, 2018

It’s a persistent global issue, but a small company in Argentina tackles it head on.

"We exposed the gender pay gap in a way that everyone could see it."

Argentina has two different $100 bills: one with the image of a man, former president Julio Roca, and the other with the image of the country’s former First Lady, Eva Perón.

The bill with Evita’s image? It was worth 27 more pesos on International Women’s Day at a sweets shop in Buenos Aires. Unfair? Of course. But Nicolás Zarlenga and Federico Plaza Montero, ECDs at HOY by Havas in Buenos Aires, talk about how the campaign raised awareness about gender pay inequality in Argentina—and across the globe.

 

Tell us about the societal impact of the gender pay gap in Argentina.

The social impact of the gender pay gap in Argentina is as big as in the rest of the world. We believe that it’s one of those global ills that affects everyone. And that’s why we think Cannes Lions juries were moved by this campaign—because it’s a societal issue in Argentina and in every country on the globe, although Belgium has the smallest reported gender pay gap in the European Union at 1.1%. Even this is too much.

So, describe this campaign, “The Equality Bill.”

DDL & Co. is a small company, but it wanted its first advertising campaign to address a nationally relevant issue—something disruptive to make its voice heard. To achieve this goal, the agency set out to raise awareness about a hot-button issue: the existing pay gap between men and women in Argentina.

On International Women’s Day at the DDL & Co. stores, the $100 bills with Evita’s portrait were worth 27% more than Roca’s. The problem was made evidently clear to consumers in a concrete and tangible way. We exposed the gender pay gap in a way that everyone could see it.

"Eighty percent of the people paid with the bill that had Evita’s image."

Why was International Women’s Day an optimal time to launch this campaign?

It was an optimal time because on that particular day we were acknowledging women’s struggle for equal rights on a global level, including wage parity. DDL & Co. and the team at Havas did their part to make an impact.

What was the response?

The response from customers at DDL & Co. was amazing; we didn’t expect it at all. Eighty percent of the people paid with the bill that had Evita’s image. We duplicated the average reach thanks to earned media. March 8, 2018 was the day with the biggest sales of the year for the brand.

Also, we had more than 45 influencers who, in some way, talked about the action. Engagement jumped 7%.

The campaign won a Silver Lion in the Direct category at the 2018 Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity.

Most important was that both women and men participated.

Was the creative team expecting such a great reception from the industry?

Not really. We didn’t do this to win awards at festivals. We believe that awards are consequences of good work, and this is the case.

How does DDL & Co. plan to keep the conversation going?

We are trying to touch other social issues. Something as autochthonous as “dulce de leche” will allow us to touch social issues that include all Argentines.

"We exposed the gender pay gap in a way that everyone could see it."

Argentina has two different $100 bills: one with the image of a man, former president Julio Roca, and the other with the image of the country’s former First Lady, Eva Perón.

The bill with Evita’s image? It was worth 27 more pesos on International Women’s Day at a sweets shop in Buenos Aires. Unfair? Of course. But Nicolás Zarlenga and Federico Plaza Montero, ECDs at HOY by Havas in Buenos Aires, talk about how the campaign raised awareness about gender pay inequality in Argentina—and across the globe.

 

Tell us about the societal impact of the gender pay gap in Argentina.

The social impact of the gender pay gap in Argentina is as big as in the rest of the world. We believe that it’s one of those global ills that affects everyone. And that’s why we think Cannes Lions juries were moved by this campaign—because it’s a societal issue in Argentina and in every country on the globe, although Belgium has the smallest reported gender pay gap in the European Union at 1.1%. Even this is too much.

So, describe this campaign, “The Equality Bill.”

DDL & Co. is a small company, but it wanted its first advertising campaign to address a nationally relevant issue—something disruptive to make its voice heard. To achieve this goal, the agency set out to raise awareness about a hot-button issue: the existing pay gap between men and women in Argentina.

On International Women’s Day at the DDL & Co. stores, the $100 bills with Evita’s portrait were worth 27% more than Roca’s. The problem was made evidently clear to consumers in a concrete and tangible way. We exposed the gender pay gap in a way that everyone could see it.

"Eighty percent of the people paid with the bill that had Evita’s image."

Why was International Women’s Day an optimal time to launch this campaign?

It was an optimal time because on that particular day we were acknowledging women’s struggle for equal rights on a global level, including wage parity. DDL & Co. and the team at Havas did their part to make an impact.

What was the response?

The response from customers at DDL & Co. was amazing; we didn’t expect it at all. Eighty percent of the people paid with the bill that had Evita’s image. We duplicated the average reach thanks to earned media. March 8, 2018 was the day with the biggest sales of the year for the brand.

Also, we had more than 45 influencers who, in some way, talked about the action. Engagement jumped 7%.

The campaign won a Silver Lion in the Direct category at the 2018 Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity.

Most important was that both women and men participated.

Was the creative team expecting such a great reception from the industry?

Not really. We didn’t do this to win awards at festivals. We believe that awards are consequences of good work, and this is the case.

How does DDL & Co. plan to keep the conversation going?

We are trying to touch other social issues. Something as autochthonous as “dulce de leche” will allow us to touch social issues that include all Argentines.

Natasha Smith is the strategic communications manager for Havas Group. She happily represents 404 in the 212.

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