havas Content printed form Havas - The Download - http://download.havas.com/posts/the-fire-that-fuels-an-adman/
Agency Life

The Fire That Fuels an Adman

The Fire That Fuels an Adman

Natasha Smith

Natasha Smith

April 3, 2018

25-year-old advertising man Emanuel Fabris talks about his burning passion for his volunteer work as a firefighter.

"Personal progress doesn’t exist if there’s no group progress."

Emanuel Fabris is an ad operations analyst on the DBI Data team at Havas Group Argentina. But for more than year, he’s been dedicating his nights to volunteering as a fireman in Morón, Buenos Aires.

“I love serving the community and being on the move. I love adrenaline,” says Fabris, the youngest of seven siblings. Fabris earned his degree in advertising from the Universidad Abierta Interamericana in Buenos Aires. “But my whole life I wanted to volunteer as a firefighter, and when people ask me what my professional vocation is, I always say that it’s divided between advertising and community service.”

So in 2016, Fabris decided to join a nearby fire department. And the following year, he earned his degree in medical emergencies. “You never forget your first day out in the streets,” he says when describing an emergency situation. “From the moment the bell rings, we change into the proper gear and everyone loads into a fire truck—all in less than a minute.”

Optimistic and enthusiastic, Fabris says that he pictures himself as both an adman and a firefighter for years to come. “It’s complicated to balance everything but, trust me, It can be done,” Fabris says. “I am on duty once a week, and one weekend each month. So, I’m on duty every Wednesday from 8 p.m. to 8 a.m.—and then I go straight to the office.”

He warns, however, that life as a firefighter is not easy. “The hardest part is dealing with the human element because when the fire dies down, it may have destroyed a family’s house,” says Fabris. “On one occasion, I helped rescue a cyclist who had been injured in a car crash. Another time, a policeman had been shot in a robbery. We were there to help. We save lives. And just as important, we serve the community in every possible way. Volunteer firefighters don’t see any economic benefit; our main goal is to serve the community. ”

Fabris says that, initially, his parents weren’t sure about the idea but today support him 100 percent. And he says that, to the surprise of some, his work with the fire department and in the office at Havas Group have a lot in common.

“In both places, my attitude toward the job is the same: For me, it’s about learning as much as possible and working in teams to achieve the best results,” he says. “Personal progress doesn’t exist if there’s no group progress. That is why everything works better when we all work together, as a team. We are always better together.”

"Personal progress doesn’t exist if there’s no group progress."

Emanuel Fabris is an ad operations analyst on the DBI Data team at Havas Group Argentina. But for more than year, he’s been dedicating his nights to volunteering as a fireman in Morón, Buenos Aires.

“I love serving the community and being on the move. I love adrenaline,” says Fabris, the youngest of seven siblings. Fabris earned his degree in advertising from the Universidad Abierta Interamericana in Buenos Aires. “But my whole life I wanted to volunteer as a firefighter, and when people ask me what my professional vocation is, I always say that it’s divided between advertising and community service.”

So in 2016, Fabris decided to join a nearby fire department. And the following year, he earned his degree in medical emergencies. “You never forget your first day out in the streets,” he says when describing an emergency situation. “From the moment the bell rings, we change into the proper gear and everyone loads into a fire truck—all in less than a minute.”

Optimistic and enthusiastic, Fabris says that he pictures himself as both an adman and a firefighter for years to come. “It’s complicated to balance everything but, trust me, It can be done,” Fabris says. “I am on duty once a week, and one weekend each month. So, I’m on duty every Wednesday from 8 p.m. to 8 a.m.—and then I go straight to the office.”

He warns, however, that life as a firefighter is not easy. “The hardest part is dealing with the human element because when the fire dies down, it may have destroyed a family’s house,” says Fabris. “On one occasion, I helped rescue a cyclist who had been injured in a car crash. Another time, a policeman had been shot in a robbery. We were there to help. We save lives. And just as important, we serve the community in every possible way. Volunteer firefighters don’t see any economic benefit; our main goal is to serve the community. ”

Fabris says that, initially, his parents weren’t sure about the idea but today support him 100 percent. And he says that, to the surprise of some, his work with the fire department and in the office at Havas Group have a lot in common.

“In both places, my attitude toward the job is the same: For me, it’s about learning as much as possible and working in teams to achieve the best results,” he says. “Personal progress doesn’t exist if there’s no group progress. That is why everything works better when we all work together, as a team. We are always better together.”

Natasha Smith is the strategic communications manager for Havas Group. She happily represents 404 in the 212.

contact our office

Call:

Stop by:

Connect: