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The Reimagined Crocodile

The Reimagined Crocodile

Michael Carnevale

Michael Carnevale

March 8, 2018

Limited-edition polos call attention to 10 endangered species.

For the first time in the brand’s history, Lacoste changed its iconic crocodile logo. It’s part of an effort to help fight the extinction of 10 endangered animals.

Lacoste worked with the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), an international organization that fights for nature conservation. Together, they identified rare reptiles, birds, and mammals, and determined how they could call attention to the Save Our Species campaign, created by BETC Paris. BETC president Bertille Toledano shares how the logo change came about and explains how the number of shirts on sale highlighted the dwindling population of each endangered species.

 

Tell us a little bit about this campaign.

The idea is to help the IUCN call attention to threatened animal species by using Lacoste’s most iconic asset, the crocodile logo.  

In Lacoste’s 85-year history, the logo has remained the same. How did the idea of changing the iconic logo come about?

The crocodile is one of the 10 most famous logos in the world. It’s a key brand asset, and this is why we suggested that Lacoste take advantage of it to raise awareness for this cause.

Was there ever any hesitation about changing the logo?

Not at all. Lacoste immediately liked the idea and was willing to develop it with us. It’s a strong commitment.

What is the call-to-action in this campaign?

The main objective is to raise attention about the situation of many animal species and to invite people to get involved by buying a polo or donating to IUCN. And there is also a wish to bring more visibility to IUCN programs that help protect wildlife.

"By using Lacoste’s most iconic asset, the crocodile logo."

Can you explain the connection between the quantities of shirts for sale and the number of endangered animals on the planet?

Sure. For each species, the number of polo shirts produced corresponds to the number of animals remaining in the wild. Ranging from 30 shirts for the vaquita to 450 for the Anegada rock iguana, in total Lacoste created 1,775 polo shirts.

What impact do you hope that this campaign will have?

Raising money and attention.

What’s been the response so far?

Very positive. All polos were sold out quickly and media coverage has been global and exceeded all expectations.

Where can people buy one of these limited edition shirts?

They were for sale on the Lacoste website, available for shipping to Europe and the U.S. but they were sold out in the first 24 hours in Europe.

The 10 species represented and the number of shirts produced:

Vaquita (Gulf of California porpoise): 30

Burmese roofed turtle: 40

Northern sportive lemur: 50

Javan rhino: 67

Cao-vit gibbon (ape): 150

Kakapo (parrot): 157

California condor: 231

Saola (herbivore): 250

Sumatran tiger: 350

Anegada ground iguana: 450

For the first time in the brand’s history, Lacoste changed its iconic crocodile logo. It’s part of an effort to help fight the extinction of 10 endangered animals.

Lacoste worked with the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), an international organization that fights for nature conservation. Together, they identified rare reptiles, birds, and mammals, and determined how they could call attention to the Save Our Species campaign, created by BETC Paris. BETC president Bertille Toledano shares how the logo change came about and explains how the number of shirts on sale highlighted the dwindling population of each endangered species.

 

Tell us a little bit about this campaign.

The idea is to help the IUCN call attention to threatened animal species by using Lacoste’s most iconic asset, the crocodile logo.  

In Lacoste’s 85-year history, the logo has remained the same. How did the idea of changing the iconic logo come about?

The crocodile is one of the 10 most famous logos in the world. It’s a key brand asset, and this is why we suggested that Lacoste take advantage of it to raise awareness for this cause.

Was there ever any hesitation about changing the logo?

Not at all. Lacoste immediately liked the idea and was willing to develop it with us. It’s a strong commitment.

What is the call-to-action in this campaign?

The main objective is to raise attention about the situation of many animal species and to invite people to get involved by buying a polo or donating to IUCN. And there is also a wish to bring more visibility to IUCN programs that help protect wildlife.

"By using Lacoste’s most iconic asset, the crocodile logo."

Can you explain the connection between the quantities of shirts for sale and the number of endangered animals on the planet?

Sure. For each species, the number of polo shirts produced corresponds to the number of animals remaining in the wild. Ranging from 30 shirts for the vaquita to 450 for the Anegada rock iguana, in total Lacoste created 1,775 polo shirts.

What impact do you hope that this campaign will have?

Raising money and attention.

What’s been the response so far?

Very positive. All polos were sold out quickly and media coverage has been global and exceeded all expectations.

Where can people buy one of these limited edition shirts?

They were for sale on the Lacoste website, available for shipping to Europe and the U.S. but they were sold out in the first 24 hours in Europe.

The 10 species represented and the number of shirts produced:

Vaquita (Gulf of California porpoise): 30

Burmese roofed turtle: 40

Northern sportive lemur: 50

Javan rhino: 67

Cao-vit gibbon (ape): 150

Kakapo (parrot): 157

California condor: 231

Saola (herbivore): 250

Sumatran tiger: 350

Anegada ground iguana: 450

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