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For the Love of Meat

For the Love of Meat

Michael Carnevale

Michael Carnevale

April 6, 2018

Even if that means taking a day off from it.

"I don’t think they were ready for something this bold right out of the gate."

When you strive to become the world’s leader in sustainable meat, it’s wise to take a moment to self-reflect. Greenfield Natural Meat Co. and Havas Canada in Toronto did just that to come up with a “selfless” solution. Cory Eisentraut, VP Creative Director of Havas Canada, walks us through their thought process for their “Meatless Mondays” campaign, and why it took nearly two years to get the green light.

 

Why would a company that sells meat products commit to something like Meatless Mondays?

Since it’s launch a few years ago, Greenfield Natural Meat Co. has had the goal of becoming the world’s leader in sustainable meat. And until this year, their efforts have focused on the way they raise their animals and make their meat: no hormones, no antibiotics, and no preservatives. But we recognized that production is only one side of the sustainability issue, so our team approached Greenfield about meat consumption.

So how does Meatless Mondays help the environment?

Meat consumption has been skyrocketing around the world over the last two decades. This has led to a huge increase in greenhouse gases and an enormous reduction in forests. It also causes an inordinate strain on our grain and water supplies. The statistics are shocking. More than half of the water in the U.S., for instance, is used to grow feed crops for livestock. Our goal with this campaign was to convince consumers to eat a little less meat. And when they do eat meat, to ensure that it is produced in a sustainable way.

How did the creative team come up with this idea?

This campaign was originally conceived two years ago when we were first creating our launch campaign for Greenfield. Although it was presented then, we all agreed that it wouldn’t be the right launch into the marketplace. We needed to first introduce Greenfield into the market and then tell people what we stood for. Plus, I don’t think they were ready for something this bold right out of the gate.

"In all, the approval process took nearly two years."

Was there any hesitation from the client?

The brand team at Greenfield was incredibly supportive of this initiative right from the first time we presented it. The executives and directors, however, took some convincing. And we faced even more skepticism from the sales team. Their goal is to sell as much Greenfield meat as possible, and they weren’t initially convinced that this campaign could do that. Ultimately, it took us dozens of internal meetings with stakeholders where we presented many other business cases, like REI’s #OptOutside, Hyundai Assurance, and Patagonia’s “Don’t Buy This Jacket,” before we finally had the final go-ahead. In all, the approval process took nearly two years.

What’s been the reaction to the campaign so far?

The reaction to the campaign was immediate. Consumers and organizations that care about the planet heralded the campaign and shared it and commented on it. Naturally, people who rely on the meat industry for a living also commented, with several fervently laced with f-bombs.

Any other ideas that support sustainability in the works?

Greenfield is following up this campaign with several other extensions. We’re in the middle of a content series we’ve called, “The Veggie Butcher,” where we’re showing consumers the proper way to cut and prepare interesting vegetables like eggplant, squash, and zucchini. And on the production side, Greenfield continues to find smarter ways to make their meat so that it has a smaller impact on the planet. Later this year, our team will be traveling out to Manitoba to film a series of videos detailing these processes for their social channels.

"I don’t think they were ready for something this bold right out of the gate."

When you strive to become the world’s leader in sustainable meat, it’s wise to take a moment to self-reflect. Greenfield Natural Meat Co. and Havas Canada in Toronto did just that to come up with a “selfless” solution. Cory Eisentraut, VP Creative Director of Havas Canada, walks us through their thought process for their “Meatless Mondays” campaign, and why it took nearly two years to get the green light.

 

Why would a company that sells meat products commit to something like Meatless Mondays?

Since it’s launch a few years ago, Greenfield Natural Meat Co. has had the goal of becoming the world’s leader in sustainable meat. And until this year, their efforts have focused on the way they raise their animals and make their meat: no hormones, no antibiotics, and no preservatives. But we recognized that production is only one side of the sustainability issue, so our team approached Greenfield about meat consumption.

So how does Meatless Mondays help the environment?

Meat consumption has been skyrocketing around the world over the last two decades. This has led to a huge increase in greenhouse gases and an enormous reduction in forests. It also causes an inordinate strain on our grain and water supplies. The statistics are shocking. More than half of the water in the U.S., for instance, is used to grow feed crops for livestock. Our goal with this campaign was to convince consumers to eat a little less meat. And when they do eat meat, to ensure that it is produced in a sustainable way.

How did the creative team come up with this idea?

This campaign was originally conceived two years ago when we were first creating our launch campaign for Greenfield. Although it was presented then, we all agreed that it wouldn’t be the right launch into the marketplace. We needed to first introduce Greenfield into the market and then tell people what we stood for. Plus, I don’t think they were ready for something this bold right out of the gate.

"In all, the approval process took nearly two years."

Was there any hesitation from the client?

The brand team at Greenfield was incredibly supportive of this initiative right from the first time we presented it. The executives and directors, however, took some convincing. And we faced even more skepticism from the sales team. Their goal is to sell as much Greenfield meat as possible, and they weren’t initially convinced that this campaign could do that. Ultimately, it took us dozens of internal meetings with stakeholders where we presented many other business cases, like REI’s #OptOutside, Hyundai Assurance, and Patagonia’s “Don’t Buy This Jacket,” before we finally had the final go-ahead. In all, the approval process took nearly two years.

What’s been the reaction to the campaign so far?

The reaction to the campaign was immediate. Consumers and organizations that care about the planet heralded the campaign and shared it and commented on it. Naturally, people who rely on the meat industry for a living also commented, with several fervently laced with f-bombs.

Any other ideas that support sustainability in the works?

Greenfield is following up this campaign with several other extensions. We’re in the middle of a content series we’ve called, “The Veggie Butcher,” where we’re showing consumers the proper way to cut and prepare interesting vegetables like eggplant, squash, and zucchini. And on the production side, Greenfield continues to find smarter ways to make their meat so that it has a smaller impact on the planet. Later this year, our team will be traveling out to Manitoba to film a series of videos detailing these processes for their social channels.

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